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NEW REPORT REVEALS IMPACT OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE ON MINNESOTA


Tue, Mar 9th, 2010
Posted in State of Minnesota

Minneapolis, Minnesota, March 9, 2010 - According to the Alzheimer's Association's® 2010 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures, ....



Rising Prevalence

There are 5.3 million Americans living with the disease, including 97,760 living in Minnesota alone.

There are 97,760 people living with Alzheimer's disease in Minnesota and that number is expected to rise to 114,400 by 2025.

"Alzheimer's is a significant threat not only for the nation - but also for the people of Minnesota, said Mary Birchard, the executive director of the Alzheimer's Association's Minnesota-North Dakota.





Impact of Alzheimer and Dementia Caregivers

With family members providing care at home for about 70 percent of people with Alzheimer's disease, the ripple effects of Alzheimer's disease can be felt throughout the affected person's entire family.

According to Facts and Figures, in 2009, nearly 11 million Alzheimer caregivers in the U.S. provided 12.5 billion hours of unpaid care valued at $144 billion.

In Minnesota alone, 196,105 caregivers, provided 223,324,620 hours of unpaid care for a loved one with Alzheimer's or another dementia valued at $2,568,233,134.

The new report also reveals that more than 40 percent of family and other unpaid Alzheimer and dementia caregivers rate the emotional stress of caregiving as high or very high, compared with 28 percent of caregivers of other older people.

Special Report on Race, Ethnicity and Alzheimer's Disease

Although whites make up the great majority of the more than five million people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, African-Americans and Hispanics are at higher risk for developing the disease.

Although whites makes up the great majority of the more than five million people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, African-Americans are about two times more likely than whites to have Alzheimer's and other dementias.

Although whites make up the great majority of the more than five million people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, Hispanics are about one and one-half times more likely than whites to have Alzheimer's and other dementias.

There are no known genetic factors that can explain the greater prevalence of Alzheimer's and other dementias in African-Americans and Hispanics than in whites.

Conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes, which are known risk factors for Alzheimer's and other dementias in all groups, are more common in African-Americans and Hispanics than in whites.

High blood pressure and diabetes are potentially modifiable conditions and better management of these conditions could help to reduce the prevalence of Alzheimer's and other dementias.

Although African-Americans and/or Hispanics are more likely than whites to have Alzheimer's and dementia, they are less likely than whites to have a diagnosis of the condition.

Delays in diagnosis mean that African-Americans and/or Hispanics are not getting treatment in the earlier stages of the disease when treatments are most effective and they also miss the opportunity to make legal, financial and care plans.

"Early detection, diagnosis and intervention are vital because they provide individuals the best opportunities for treatment, support and planning for their future," said Birchard "We know many families miss the warning signs or mistakenly assume symptoms are a normal part of aging. The Minnesota-North Dakota Chapter has worked hard to educate our community about those signs that may actually be cause for concern and warrant medical follow up. Our upcoming dementia conference on March 20 is an opportunity for people to learn more about Alzheimer's and related dementias."



The full text of the Alzheimer's Association's 2010 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures can be viewed at www.alz.org/mnnd.



Alzheimer's Association's Facts and Figures

The Alzheimer's Association's Facts and Figures report is a comprehensive compilation of national

statistics and information on Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. The report conveys the impact of Alzheimer's on individuals, families, government, and the nation's health care system. Since its 2007 inaugural release, the report has become the most cited source covering the broad spectrum of Alzheimer issues. The Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report is an official publication of the Alzheimer's Association®.



Alzheimer's Association's and Mayo Clinic Dementia Conference

A Meeting of the Minds Dementia Conference 2010 is the premier dementia conference for persons with early dementia, families, friends and professionals. The Alzheimer's Association Minnesota-North Dakota and Mayo Clinic invite you to join us on March 20, 2010 at the St. Paul RiverCentre.



This year's keynote presentation, "On the Brain - the Rock Stars of Science," will be a lively and informative dialogue with two of the most renowned researchers who recently were featured in GQ Magazine's Rock Stars of Science campaign - Dr. Ronald Petersen, Mayo Clinic and Dr. Steven DeKosky, University of Virginia.



By popular demand, perennial conference favorite, Teepa Snow, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA will presents the closing keynote, "Let Go of the Could'a, Should'a, Would'a - Choose to Connect & Make Moments of Joy"

Medical Symposium - Held in conjunction with the conference, this symposium for dementia experts and thought-leaders will address the changing landscape of dementia care, treatment and prevention.

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