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Tech Bytes - Profiling


By Mitchell Walbridge

Fri, Aug 2nd, 2013
Posted in All Columnists



Profiling, “the recording and analysis of a person’s psychological and behavioral characteristics, so as to assess or predict their capabilities,” is often associated in a negative light when you’re the potential employee. When you’re the employer, however, profiling prospective employees is one the best ways to help determine whether to say ‘yea’ or ‘nay’ to a potential hire.

The way you showcase yourself in the interview room is, no doubt, a huge portion of whether you’ll be considered for the job, but the way you showcase yourself online holds significant weight as well. There’s no doubt that controversy exists over whether employers should be able to access and analyze your Facebook account, but whether you give them your login credentials or not, they can still look you up.

Findings after a University of North Carolina study showed that employers often look at applicants Facebook profiles searching for evidence of drug and alcohol use or signs that an individual is not responsible or self-disciplined.

Not to stereotype, but heavy drinkers or drug addicts probably aren’t the large target audience to read this column. The reason for this week’s column is to bring awareness to the fact that when posting to your personal social media accounts, it’s important to use good judgment. Being especially attentive to make sure you don’t post something that could easily be mistaken or misjudged.

Nothing is private anymore, unless of course you don’t have any link to social media. This group is a very small percentage of people. The bottom line here is social media users – beware of social media profiling because it happens more often than you think. Take a moment and think before you post; employers – I probably just took a little bit of fun out of the candidate screening process by making it more of an even playing field.

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