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One Moment, Please... What’s important?


Fri, Sep 28th, 2012
Posted in All Commentary

Seriously, what is important? In my world, professional sports are just a form of entertainment. When you look at professional sports like the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA or any others at that level, they are merely athletic reality TV shows. They are getting paid to perform for a crowd, live and on TV, no different than all of that fake wrestling stuff like WWE or whatever it is called these days. Yes, they are amazing athletes, but it is still just a form of entertainment.

So, when I heard about the catch that Packer fans decry as an unworthy touchdown benefiting the Seattle Seahawks, I say, “So what. Who cares. It’s just entertainment.”

And, believe me, I enjoy a good football game. I have played football, and I enjoy playing a wide variety of sports. But, at the end of the day, should our national media monopolize their time and resources with every angle of the issues surrounding the catch heard around the world? No. We have more important things going on in our world than whether a touchdown should or should not count. A coach once told me that if whether we won or lost the game came down to a referee’s decision, then we left that game up for grabs and didn’t deserve to win.

It also amazes me that such a big issue has been made about the referees, replacement referees and negotiations with the National Football League. The referees do NOT work full-time, but they want full-time benefits and pension. A starting referee makes $75,000 per year (to work 17 weeks plus the playoffs) while senior referees make upwards of $200,000 per year. Well, they are certainly getting a boost in pay with the recently settled negotiations. I guarantee that if the replacement referees had more time to do what the regular referees did week after week, they would learn from their mistakes and establish the experience to make better game time decisions.

And, can you believe that the Mayor of Green Bay, Jim Schmitt, wrote a letter to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell expressing his concerns over the officiating at the end of the Packers-Seahawks game? He indicated that this could have “significant financial effect” on the Green Bay community.

Sadly, our professional sports in the United States are 100 percent about money; not the fans. And, the fans pay the price to give professional athletes millions, not to mention the owners of these teams. I suppose the referees look at how financially corrupt the entire NFL is, and they feel they should get their share of the football pie.

When $150 million dollars changed hands in Vegas as a result of the one touchdown that the Packers said should have not counted for the Seahawks, we have a problem in America. And, this is just one week. Can you imagine how much money is gambled away during the Super Bowl?

But, this is what is important to Americans. I enjoy sports just as much as the next guy, but it is still just a form of entertainment at the professional level. Who is to say these games aren’t somewhat rigged? Especially when millions are changing hands.

And, I would say that our Congress deserves a slap on the wrist for wasting taxpayer dollars bringing Major League Baseball players in for questioning regarding the use of steroids. First off, the reality is that those who use steroids will almost always suffer from health-related issues later on in life, and if they want to earn their accolades the wrong way, then they will have to live with that for the rest of their lives. Secondly, why is our Congress focusing their energy on something so ridiculous. If you ask me, and you didn’t (but that’s OK, because I’ll tell you anyway), our politicians often focus on low hanging fruit to avoid dealing with bigger issues. A politician will say, “I’m against the use of steroids and performance enhancing drugs.” Well, duh. Who isn’t?

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