"Where Fillmore County News Comes First"
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Saturday, July 26th, 2014
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Monday, April 24, 2000


Tue, Apr 11th, 2000
Posted in

To the Editor,
What kind of person would abandon or abuse a pet? Why would such a person have a pet to begin with? The recent Journal article, "A Cause for Paws," by Lynne Farmer appeared at about the same time someone abandoned two young black labs in the Big Woods. The dogs are friendly, but cower when approached, which leads us to believe they've been abused. I join Dixie Aug of Preston and other concerned citizens in believing it's time for Fillmore County to have an animal shelter. But we don't have a shelter yet and the immediate problem here in the woods is what to do about the two black labs. They are being fed, but continue to run loose in the woods, which is not good for the already stressed wildlife. The Big Woods people are looking for a home for these two half-grown pups. If you can provide a home or know someone who can, please contact me at 507-743-8584 or bigwoods@ means.net.
Nancy Overcott
Canton, MN

To the Editor,
I was really interested in Lynne Farmer’s article “A Cause for Paws” in last week’s Journal. I’m glad people are talking about animals in a compassionate way. Modern research teaches us how close we are genetically, so now we know what the American Indians always knew: animals are our brothers and sisters. As the article points out, animals are the victims of a human problem. There’s a fellow from California (founder of the San Francisco Animal Rescue) who is backed by a lot of money and charged with the task of traveling around the country to animal shelters and rescue organizations. He’s helping them to evolve toward a no-kill (of healthy animals) policy. If particiapting shelters can arrive at their goal in five years, they’re given one million dollars! This is according to a feature article appearing in the Denver Post. If Fillmore County were to establish a shelter that had a no-kill policy, we could be eligible for a lot of money, an endowment that could help the shelter in the future. Many places have been successful. Citizens and shelter workers report that they’re much happier for it. I suppose animals are too. It’s a better way to live and what we’re all working toward anyway. If Fillmore County were to have an animal shelter, my wish would be that they would also have scanners to detect subcutaneous identification tags. People are starting to use them now because they’re permanant and simple to put in place (no anesthetic required). Collars get lost, especially when it comes to cats. My cats have learned to unbuckle them, so I have to keep their rabies tags in the file drawer. I also think it would be great if we could provide subsidized spaying and neutering to pet owners who want to neuter their pets but have trouble coming up with the money. Many vets will help with such programs because they don’t like having to kill healthy animals. A program such as this might save a lot of money in the long run. Thanks for caring about animals. I read a quote by Gandhi a while ago (was it in the Journal?) that bears repeating, but I can only remember enough to paraphrase it. It goes something like “a nation can be judged by the way it treats its animals.”
Marie Winckler
Canton, MN

To the Editor,
The Eagle Bluff Youth Education Banquet is an annual fund raising event. The proceeds of this event benefit youth. The event is attended by adults and consists of a formal dinner, accompanied by raffles, silent and live auction. Benefits from this charitable event are used to enhance Eagle Bluff’s educational programs as determined by the Board of Directors and the staff. This year 150 adults collectively raised over $13,000. This money will provide scholarships to Eagle Bluff’s summer Ecology Camp, July 30- August 4th , acquire props and materials needed for new classes and for environmental monitoring equipment. The proceeds from last year's banquet purchased snowshoes and cross country skiing equipment. The previous year we purchased river monitoring equipment, including microscopes. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who donated their time, talent and gifts to this year’s fund raiser. An additional thank you to all who attended this year’s event. It is with your financial support that Eagle Bluff has been able to attain a standard of education that now benefits over twenty thousand students and adults a year and has allowed us to purchase much needed materials over the last six years that otherwise would not have been possible. Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center is a 501 (c) (3) private, non-profit, member-supported organization. The mission of Eagle Bluff is to foster awareness, enhance respect, and promote personal responsibility to the natural world.
Joe Deden
Executive Director
Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center
Lanesboro, MN

To the Editor,
This letter is in response to the letter signed by A. Fitzgerald regarding manure on Highway 16. The best way to get something done, is to do it yourself. If they had done a little research, they might have found out a number of things, such as: The residue on Hwy 16 comes from more than one source, including the dairy located there and from cattle-semis leaving the Lanesboro Sales Barn. The dairy there is a superbly run family operation, soon to reach the Century Farm designation, who are constantly working to improve both economically and environmentally. They are exactly the kind of family farm that deserves public support for spending so much time and energy, not just to practice sustainable farming methods but working to improve the land while producing food for an ever growing world population. The residue left on the road by their tractors is more mud than manure, generally. Extra steps are taken to keep even mud on the road to a minimum. Also, that recent changes in their practices, while not instituted specifically to keep the roads cleaner, will in fact do that by having to haul fewer loads while maintaining proper nutrient levels in their fields. The semis hauling cattle to the sales barn are no longer allowed to clean out while at the sales barn. This edict was probably instituted with the intention of preventing manure from reaching the river. However, it seems to be backfiring, since cleaning the semis using proper procedures would allow the manure to be used to improve farm land. Instead, because the semis aren’t cleaned out, the manure inadvertently slops out as the trucks go up the hill leaving town. This may be an example of too quick a solution being as bad as the initial problem. A telephone call to each place would probably have resulted in this information. Instead of making public complaints, A. Fitzgerald might have fostered better relations within our communities and learned as well what steps could be taken to actually resolve a problem, rather than asking someone else to solve it. Since this issue is important to you, A. Fitzgerald, take the initiative. Speak with the parties involved and mediate a solution.
Kim Marie Fournier
Whalan, MNTo the Editor,
What kind of person would abandon or abuse a pet? Why would such a person have a pet to begin with? The recent Journal article, "A Cause for Paws," by Lynne Farmer appeared at about the same time someone abandoned two young black labs in the Big Woods. The dogs are friendly, but cower when approached, which leads us to believe they've been abused. I join Dixie Aug of Preston and other concerned citizens in believing it's time for Fillmore County to have an animal shelter. But we don't have a shelter yet and the immediate problem here in the woods is what to do about the two black labs. They are being fed, but continue to run loose in the woods, which is not good for the already stressed wildlife. The Big Woods people are looking for a home for these two half-grown pups. If you can provide a home or know someone who can, please contact me at 507-743-8584 or bigwoods@ means.net.
Nancy Overcott
Canton, MN

To the Editor,
I was really interested in Lynne Farmer’s article “A Cause for Paws” in last week’s Journal. I’m glad people are talking about animals in a compassionate way. Modern research teaches us how close we are genetically, so now we know what the American Indians always knew: animals are our brothers and sisters. As the article points out, animals are the victims of a human problem. There’s a fellow from California (founder of the San Francisco Animal Rescue) who is backed by a lot of money and charged with the task of traveling around the country to animal shelters and rescue organizations. He’s helping them to evolve toward a no-kill (of healthy animals) policy. If particiapting shelters can arrive at their goal in five years, they’re given one million dollars! This is according to a feature article appearing in the Denver Post. If Fillmore County were to establish a shelter that had a no-kill policy, we could be eligible for a lot of money, an endowment that could help the shelter in the future. Many places have been successful. Citizens and shelter workers report that they’re much happier for it. I suppose animals are too. It’s a better way to live and what we’re all working toward anyway. If Fillmore County were to have an animal shelter, my wish would be that they would also have scanners to detect subcutaneous identification tags. People are starting to use them now because they’re permanant and simple to put in place (no anesthetic required). Collars get lost, especially when it comes to cats. My cats have learned to unbuckle them, so I have to keep their rabies tags in the file drawer. I also think it would be great if we could provide subsidized spaying and neutering to pet owners who want to neuter their pets but have trouble coming up with the money. Many vets will help with such programs because they don’t like having to kill healthy animals. A program such as this might save a lot of money in the long run. Thanks for caring about animals. I read a quote by Gandhi a while ago (was it in the Journal?) that bears repeating, but I can only remember enough to paraphrase it. It goes something like “a nation can be judged by the way it treats its animals.”
Marie Winckler
Canton, MN

To the Editor,
The Eagle Bluff Youth Education Banquet is an annual fund raising event. The proceeds of this event benefit youth. The event is attended by adults and consists of a formal dinner, accompanied by raffles, silent and live auction. Benefits from this charitable event are used to enhance Eagle Bluff’s educational programs as determined by the Board of Directors and the staff. This year 150 adults collectively raised over $13,000. This money will provide scholarships to Eagle Bluff’s summer Ecology Camp, July 30- August 4th , acquire props and materials needed for new classes and for environmental monitoring equipment. The proceeds from last year's banquet purchased snowshoes and cross country skiing equipment. The previous year we purchased river monitoring equipment, including microscopes. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who donated their time, talent and gifts to this year’s fund raiser. An additional thank you to all who attended this year’s event. It is with your financial support that Eagle Bluff has been able to attain a standard of education that now benefits over twenty thousand students and adults a year and has allowed us to purchase much needed materials over the last six years that otherwise would not have been possible. Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center is a 501 (c) (3) private, non-profit, member-supported organization. The mission of Eagle Bluff is to foster awareness, enhance respect, and promote personal responsibility to the natural world.
Joe Deden
Executive Director
Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center
Lanesboro, MN

To the Editor,
This letter is in response to the letter signed by A. Fitzgerald regarding manure on Highway 16. The best way to get something done, is to do it yourself. If they had done a little research, they might have found out a number of things, such as: The residue on Hwy 16 comes from more than one source, including the dairy located there and from cattle-semis leaving the Lanesboro Sales Barn. The dairy there is a superbly run family operation, soon to reach the Century Farm designation, who are constantly working to improve both economically and environmentally. They are exactly the kind of family farm that deserves public support for spending so much time and energy, not just to practice sustainable farming methods but working to improve the land while producing food for an ever growing world population. The residue left on the road by their tractors is more mud than manure, generally. Extra steps are taken to keep even mud on the road to a minimum. Also, that recent changes in their practices, while not instituted specifically to keep the roads cleaner, will in fact do that by having to haul fewer loads while maintaining proper nutrient levels in their fields. The semis hauling cattle to the sales barn are no longer allowed to clean out while at the sales barn. This edict was probably instituted with the intention of preventing manure from reaching the river. However, it seems to be backfiring, since cleaning the semis using proper procedures would allow the manure to be used to improve farm land. Instead, because the semis aren’t cleaned out, the manure inadvertently slops out as the trucks go up the hill leaving town. This may be an example of too quick a solution being as bad as the initial problem. A telephone call to each place would probably have resulted in this information. Instead of making public complaints, A. Fitzgerald might have fostered better relations within our communities and learned as well what steps could be taken to actually resolve a problem, rather than asking someone else to solve it. Since this issue is important to you, A. Fitzgerald, take the initiative. Speak with the parties involved and mediate a solution.
Kim Marie Fournier
Whalan, MN

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