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Monday, June 12, 2000


Mon, Jun 12th, 2000
Posted in

To the Editor,
My concern for canine officers and their handlers began when canine officer Lazer was shot and killed, along with two police officers, while apprehending a drug dealer in St. Paul. My concern resurfaced recently while watching police officer Andy Stender, formerly of Preston, and his canine officer Sam, on KSTP-TV out of the Cities. Sam had his throat cut by a criminal and nearly died. Now his heart is too weak to return to the rigorous duties of a canine officer. Sam will receive the highest honor the police academy presents: the Medal of Honor. We are very privileged to have police officer Chad Edwards and his canine officer, Rex, here to protect us. Rex is Fillmore Countys only canine officer. Only 20 out of 100 dogs pass the rigorous training to become a canine officer. Rex would risk his life for yours. Please help us protect him with a donation towards a bullet proof vest. Look in your area for donation drop spots. This fundraiser is sponsored by Konas Kompanions Animal Rescue.
Dixie Aug
Preston, MN

To the Editor,
Recently, we have all been witness to the force as well as the vulnerability of our natural resources. Many of us were affected by the storms and the flooding whether it was a wet basement, soil erosion, flooded fields or even in our jobs as with the staff here at the soil and water conservation district. As a natural resource professional, who is committed to promoting natural resource stewardship, I want to take this opportunity to emphasize the importance of protecting our resources. As is often the case in our society, we wait to address an issue only after there is a crisis. Conservation should not be something we only use to deal with a crisis, as we must do now, but it should be something that is practiced over a long period of time, an ethic. After these recent storms, we have seen the benefits of leaving crop residue on fields, to having properly maintianed grassed waterways and to farming on the contour. The benefits of stewardship may not always be visible but it will ensure that your soils will remain productive and that our water quality will remain high. Clean water and productive soils are basic to our quality of life now and in the future. If you need any assistance relating to natural resource conservation please call us at 507-765-3878.
Kevin Scheidecker
Fillmore SWCD Administrator

To the Editor,
For the first time in my 70 some years, I will not be an active participant in working with hay this year. While pulling some haying equipment to the local auction my mind began to go back to those early years of putting up hay.
I believe my first job when the haying season came was pulling the rope back. My older brother or sister would drive the team of horses that pulled a large amount of hay into the barn on a track. The hay fork would have to be pulled out of the barn with a trip rope by my father. His job was made easier if someone pulled back the hay rope. As I got older and stronger my job evolved into driving on the hay fork, sticking the fork, loading loose hay on the hay rack, and mowing hay in the hay mow -- terms not recognizable to the younger generation. The hay baler came along years ago, but, the first ones were hardly labor savers. Many of us remember the hand tie baler which was probably the most dusty job there ever was. Bales dropped on the ground had to be picked up by hand. Another attempt at making hay were those disagreeable small round bales. We all know the many and varied ways of making hay now and Im sure there will be many changes in the years to come. One thing will never change. Farmers will always be looking to the sky and hoping for a good weather forecast so they can make hay.
Paul Mathison
Preston, MN

To the Editor,
They say you cant turn back the hands of time. But, as I read over your newspaper sent to me by Prestons Mayor Clarence M. Quanrud I somehow believe that for four days in May I proved that saying wrong. For you see, for two years, from 1953 to 1955, I served aboard the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany CVA 34, in the Sea of Japan, on patrol duty off the coast of Korea with Mayor Quanrud, then Airman Quanrud. Through my buddy Quanrud, I came to know the town of Preston and its people. So I thought. We parted company in 1955 and went our own way to follow our careers and raise our families. He in Minnesota and I in Texas. I am tall, brown hair and dark complexioned. Of course, as some of you know, Mayor Quanrud is not. We were the best of buddies, but we were the quintessential odd couple, if you will. In mid 1999 my wife and I bought our first computer and one night I tried to the find people screen. I entered the name of Clarence M. Quanrud and lo and behold his name, address and phone number in Preston jumped up before my eyes. I immediately called Clarence and we talked for some time. After that we exchanged family pictures and began a regular stream of e-mail throughout the long Minnesota winter. I made plans to visit and on May 19 I flew to Minneapolis and drove down through the beautiful countryside to Preston. I felt like it was a homecoming, of sorts. What I was not prepared for was the welcome given to me by the people of Preston. I got to ride in the Trout Festival Parade on Saturday and was thrilled to see so many people cheering and waving along the parade route. During those four days Mayor Quanrud and I reminisced and relived those long days aboard the USS Oriskany and caught up, as best we could, on what we had been doing for the past 45 years. For four days in May I drove and walked the streets of Preston, seeing the sights and meeting the people I had come to know. But nothing could have prepared me for the beauty of your town, countryside, and the warm friendliness of the people of Preston. I came back to Texas with memories that will be with me for the rest of my life and the feeling that somehow, some way, for four days in May, I had truly turned back the hands of time. For all of the people who made my stay in Preston memorable I want to express may sincere thanks. I think of you each and every day and look forward to returning to Preston someday. Perhaps when spring returns once again to the Land of 10,000 Lakes. Until then may God bless you and keep you.
R.G. Harrell
Coppell, TXTo the Editor,
My concern for canine officers and their handlers began when canine officer Lazer was shot and killed, along with two police officers, while apprehending a drug dealer in St. Paul. My concern resurfaced recently while watching police officer Andy Stender, formerly of Preston, and his canine officer Sam, on KSTP-TV out of the Cities. Sam had his throat cut by a criminal and nearly died. Now his heart is too weak to return to the rigorous duties of a canine officer. Sam will receive the highest honor the police academy presents: the Medal of Honor. We are very privileged to have police officer Chad Edwards and his canine officer, Rex, here to protect us. Rex is Fillmore Countys only canine officer. Only 20 out of 100 dogs pass the rigorous training to become a canine officer. Rex would risk his life for yours. Please help us protect him with a donation towards a bullet proof vest. Look in your area for donation drop spots. This fundraiser is sponsored by Konas Kompanions Animal Rescue.
Dixie Aug
Preston, MN

To the Editor,
Recently, we have all been witness to the force as well as the vulnerability of our natural resources. Many of us were affected by the storms and the flooding whether it was a wet basement, soil erosion, flooded fields or even in our jobs as with the staff here at the soil and water conservation district. As a natural resource professional, who is committed to promoting natural resource stewardship, I want to take this opportunity to emphasize the importance of protecting our resources. As is often the case in our society, we wait to address an issue only after there is a crisis. Conservation should not be something we only use to deal with a crisis, as we must do now, but it should be something that is practiced over a long period of time, an ethic. After these recent storms, we have seen the benefits of leaving crop residue on fields, to having properly maintianed grassed waterways and to farming on the contour. The benefits of stewardship may not always be visible but it will ensure that your soils will remain productive and that our water quality will remain high. Clean water and productive soils are basic to our quality of life now and in the future. If you need any assistance relating to natural resource conservation please call us at 507-765-3878.
Kevin Scheidecker
Fillmore SWCD Administrator

To the Editor,
For the first time in my 70 some years, I will not be an active participant in working with hay this year. While pulling some haying equipment to the local auction my mind began to go back to those early years of putting up hay.
I believe my first job when the haying season came was pulling the rope back. My older brother or sister would drive the team of horses that pulled a large amount of hay into the barn on a track. The hay fork would have to be pulled out of the barn with a trip rope by my father. His job was made easier if someone pulled back the hay rope. As I got older and stronger my job evolved into driving on the hay fork, sticking the fork, loading loose hay on the hay rack, and mowing hay in the hay mow -- terms not recognizable to the younger generation. The hay baler came along years ago, but, the first ones were hardly labor savers. Many of us remember the hand tie baler which was probably the most dusty job there ever was. Bales dropped on the ground had to be picked up by hand. Another attempt at making hay were those disagreeable small round bales. We all know the many and varied ways of making hay now and Im sure there will be many changes in the years to come. One thing will never change. Farmers will always be looking to the sky and hoping for a good weather forecast so they can make hay.
Paul Mathison
Preston, MN

To the Editor,
They say you cant turn back the hands of time. But, as I read over your newspaper sent to me by Prestons Mayor Clarence M. Quanrud I somehow believe that for four days in May I proved that saying wrong. For you see, for two years, from 1953 to 1955, I served aboard the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany CVA 34, in the Sea of Japan, on patrol duty off the coast of Korea with Mayor Quanrud, then Airman Quanrud. Through my buddy Quanrud, I came to know the town of Preston and its people. So I thought. We parted company in 1955 and went our own way to follow our careers and raise our families. He in Minnesota and I in Texas. I am tall, brown hair and dark complexioned. Of course, as some of you know, Mayor Quanrud is not. We were the best of buddies, but we were the quintessential odd couple, if you will. In mid 1999 my wife and I bought our first computer and one night I tried to the find people screen. I entered the name of Clarence M. Quanrud and lo and behold his name, address and phone number in Preston jumped up before my eyes. I immediately called Clarence and we talked for some time. After that we exchanged family pictures and began a regular stream of e-mail throughout the long Minnesota winter. I made plans to visit and on May 19 I flew to Minneapolis and drove down through the beautiful countryside to Preston. I felt like it was a homecoming, of sorts. What I was not prepared for was the welcome given to me by the people of Preston. I got to ride in the Trout Festival Parade on Saturday and was thrilled to see so many people cheering and waving along the parade route. During those four days Mayor Quanrud and I reminisced and relived those long days aboard the USS Oriskany and caught up, as best we could, on what we had been doing for the past 45 years. For four days in May I drove and walked the streets of Preston, seeing the sights and meeting the people I had come to know. But nothing could have prepared me for the beauty of your town, countryside, and the warm friendliness of the people of Preston. I came back to Texas with memories that will be with me for the rest of my life and the feeling that somehow, some way, for four days in May, I had truly turned back the hands of time. For all of the people who made my stay in Preston memorable I want to express may sincere thanks. I think of you each and every day and look forward to returning to Preston someday. Perhaps when spring returns once again to the Land of 10,000 Lakes. Until then may God bless you and keep you.
R.G. Harrell
Coppell, TX

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