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Monday, September 25, 2000


Sun, Sep 24th, 2000
Posted in

To the Editor,

There has been some questions raised in the community about organ donation. This letter is written to dispel some of the myths and address some of these questions.

Organ donation is a life giving option for families facing the tragic loss of a loved one. Most people, even those with certain health problems, are acceptable organ donors in the event of a brain death injury. Brain death means that the brain has suffered complete and irreversible loss of all brain function. Examples of injuries that cause brain death include a ruptured blood vessel in the brain, drowning, and head trauma from a bike or motor vehicle accident. Patients who are in a coma or vegetative state are not considered for organ transplantation because there is still some brain function. In the event of injury, every attempt is made to save your life. It is only after death has been declared that organ donation is considered.

Organs that can be donated are the heart, liver, lungs, pancreas, kidneys, and intestines. One organ donor can save the lives of eight people! At the time of death, your next of kin must give written permission to donate your organs. This is why it is crucial for you to talk to your family now about your wishes to be an organ donor.

Designating your organ donation wishes on your driverís license or a signed donor card does not guarantee that you will become an organ donor. There is no cost to the donorís family for donation. All expenses involved with the organ donation are paid by the organ transplant recipient or their health insurance. Organ donors are still able to have a regular funeral including an open casket, if desired.
There are 60,000 Americans waiting to receive an organ transplant. Please talk to your family today about your wishes to be an organ donor. If you would like more information, contact LifeSource at 1-888-5-DONATE or www.life-source.org.

Becky Elsbernd, PHN
Fillmore County Public Health


To the Editor,

There has been some questions raised in the community about organ donation. This letter is written to dispel some of the myths and address some of these questions.

Organ donation is a life giving option for families facing the tragic loss of a loved one. Most people, even those with certain health problems, are acceptable organ donors in the event of a brain death injury. Brain death means that the brain has suffered complete and irreversible loss of all brain function. Examples of injuries that cause brain death include a ruptured blood vessel in the brain, drowning, and head trauma from a bike or motor vehicle accident. Patients who are in a coma or vegetative state are not considered for organ transplantation because there is still some brain function. In the event of injury, every attempt is made to save your life. It is only after death has been declared that organ donation is considered.

Organs that can be donated are the heart, liver, lungs, pancreas, kidneys, and intestines. One organ donor can save the lives of eight people! At the time of death, your next of kin must give written permission to donate your organs. This is why it is crucial for you to talk to your family now about your wishes to be an organ donor.

Designating your organ donation wishes on your driverís license or a signed donor card does not guarantee that you will become an organ donor. There is no cost to the donorís family for donation. All expenses involved with the organ donation are paid by the organ transplant recipient or their health insurance. Organ donors are still able to have a regular funeral including an open casket, if desired.
There are 60,000 Americans waiting to receive an organ transplant. Please talk to your family today about your wishes to be an organ donor. If you would like more information, contact LifeSource at 1-888-5-DONATE or www.life-source.org.

Becky Elsbernd, PHN
Fillmore County Public Health


To the Editor,

After reading the article you recently published, Deb and I felt we should add a little more fuel to the fire that was started with that article. We are referring to Al Mathisonís ďAfter ChoresĒ column (Journal, September 18) in which he interviewed Mr. Walter Norby from the Big Woods area.

We live in another part of the woods called the Shaddock Springs area or also known as Nepstad Creek. We felt that it was an appropriate time for us to add a bit more information in regard to the disgraceful things that have been happening these past few years to our dear old Big Woods.

There are quite a number of destructive forces at work here and no one individual or group of individuals are to blame for what's been happening. It ranges from individuals who are running ATV's, full sized 4-wheel drive pickups etc., through the trails that run through the bottom of the valleys in the Shaddock Springs area of the Big Woods. The trails are so torn up that a person can hardly walk, let alone try and ride a horse safely down those old trails.

They are also running the ATV's up the old walking trails that go up to Cabbage Rocks. These are, for those of you who have never seen them, some of the most beautiful rock formations we have in this county. I grew up in this area and have lived, hunted and fished in here most of my life. I have never seen the amount of damage done to the woods that is being done to it right now. What used to be an excellent trout stream is now having its banks totally ripped up from the continuous churning of ATV and pickup tires. Farmers aren't allowed to have their animals tear up the stream banks, so why is this acceptable?

Also, we are seeing the woods being mass hunted and fished by individuals from the other areas like the Twin Cities, who seem to have no regard for the hunting and fishing laws that govern the rest of us that live here. We hunt and fish too, but we abide by the laws that the DNR has set for ALL of us! A big portion of the woodland in this area is private property and NOT State owned land, as these individuals seem to believe.

I walked in the woods just last weekend and heard nary a sound of a bird, a squirrel or a deer...let alone seeing a fish in the stream! This is woodland for cripes sake!!!! What's happened to all the wildlife that used to be teeming in these woods and streams? Another issue for those of us that live here is the irresponsible shining that goes on when deer season approaches in the fall. Last fall, we had people driving up and down the dead end road we live on with their spotting lights hanging out the windows of their vehicles. Yes, I know that shining is legal, but some have their guns in the front seats of their vehicles, some are shining on land that is legally posted and/or agricultural, as well as in the pine trees of our own front yard! They drive on our neighbors' fields to turn around or park and by doing so drive over the crops. They've even shined their lights in the windows of our house, which is very close to the road.

We have younger children who live here and sometimes this scares the dickens out of them. Come on folks, if that happened to someone who lives in town, the police would be called....right? It's our choice to live here in the country, but why do people feel it's all right to constantly infringe on us, our neighbors or to do damage to the woods that many of us live near or in? In light of all that is going on, WE ALL have to take responsibility to protect our natural resources in the Big Woods. We have already talked to our local DNR officials, our local senator and representative, and basically anyone else that truly cares about this area. I have heard a number of people say that all this damage is being done by the local people who live nearby, but we disagree with that. Maybe a certain amount is done by a few local individuals who don't care, but far greater is the destruction done by those who come from out of state, the cities, or from wherever. Something needs to be done to stop this senseless waste.

We urge anyone else who cares about the Big Woods to do something to try and make a difference. Write to the editor of this paper, contact your local senator or representative, contact your local DNR officials...do something!!! Let's try to save the Big Woods for the younger generations to enjoy! Thank you.

Deb & Larry Topness
Lanesboro

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