"Where Fillmore County News Comes First"
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Monday, October 2, 2000


Sun, Oct 8th, 2000
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NO LETTERS TO THE EDITOR WERE RECEIVED THE WEEK OF OCT. 9


To the Editor,

The question has been asked, "Are we better off today?" The answer would be "NO" for us who live in Rural American.

There are many so-called solutions to "save" our towns. Tourism, trails and arts will not save our local implement dealers, veterinarians, and other businesses we as family farmers rely on. We welcome tourists to visit our beautiful area. However, we dont want to simply become a nostalgic warm fuzzy view of the past.

"Small farms cannot exist in a vacuum as relics of days gone by preserved for tourists or nostalgia for how most everyones great grandparents lived. Small farms are a vital functioning part of a working landscape that includes Jeffersonian entrepreneurs of all kinds locally owned grocery stores, garages, machinery dealerships, and other businesses operating on a similar scale as the farmers they both serve and depend on." Clark Hinsdale, Vermont

The preceding quote was taken from "A Time to Act", a report of the USDA National Commission on Small Farms, written in January, 1998.

A similar study, "A Time to Choose", was conducted by Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland in 1979. No one listened. As a result, are we better off today than we were 20 years ago?!?

We must elect people who will speak up for Rural America and can work together on bi-partisan efforts to solve the complex problems we are facing. Also we expect our elected officials to help bring our tax dollars back to SE Minnesota, which has not receive its fair share the last few years.

Judy Emery
Mabel, MN

NO LETTERS TO THE EDITOR WERE RECEIVED THE WEEK OF OCT. 9


To the Editor,

The question has been asked, "Are we better off today?" The answer would be "NO" for us who live in Rural American.

There are many so-called solutions to "save" our towns. Tourism, trails and arts will not save our local implement dealers, veterinarians, and other businesses we as family farmers rely on. We welcome tourists to visit our beautiful area. However, we dont want to simply become a nostalgic warm fuzzy view of the past.

"Small farms cannot exist in a vacuum as relics of days gone by preserved for tourists or nostalgia for how most everyones great grandparents lived. Small farms are a vital functioning part of a working landscape that includes Jeffersonian entrepreneurs of all kinds locally owned grocery stores, garages, machinery dealerships, and other businesses operating on a similar scale as the farmers they both serve and depend on." Clark Hinsdale, Vermont

The preceding quote was taken from "A Time to Act", a report of the USDA National Commission on Small Farms, written in January, 1998.

A similar study, "A Time to Choose", was conducted by Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland in 1979. No one listened. As a result, are we better off today than we were 20 years ago?!?

We must elect people who will speak up for Rural America and can work together on bi-partisan efforts to solve the complex problems we are facing. Also we expect our elected officials to help bring our tax dollars back to SE Minnesota, which has not receive its fair share the last few years.

Judy Emery
Mabel, MN

To the Editor,

I would like to thank Mary Bell for telling us about her Dad in her Vignettes in the Fillmore County Journal on September 11, 2000. I must admit what first caught my eye was the very special picture of her dad, Harold Bell, with evidently one of his favorite horses. Being a horse lover myself, I can ap-preciate what the picture tells a person - the horse liked being nuzzled by his friend Harold, too! In her article, Mary shares a lot about her dad and the kind of person he was. I wish our paths would have crossed.

The evening I read Mary's article was Wednesday, September 20, and that morning I had attended the funeral ser-vice of Robert "Dale" Copeman, co-officiated by Revs. Jeff Ol-son and Mark Rader, at the Stewartville United Methodist Church. Among many other things, funerals give us the chance for reflection, and in reading about Mary's dad, she was reflecting on the good times with family and also on the virtues her parents wanted to pass on to their children.

Rev. Rader of the Cherry Grove United Methodist Church had the good fortune of know-ing Dale Copeman for many years and in his eulogy shared past experiences with Dale and Dale's wife, Elnora. My hus-band Gust and I, too, were friends of Elnora and Dale but had never spent the time with them that Rev. Rader had. BUT we had feasted at their table and treated like royalty when they lived in their beauti-ful country home near Cherry Grove; Elnora was the best pie baker ever in my opinion. I re-member also that Dale had somehow been roped into helping us and Anita and Gib Fjelstad cut up a couple of hogs some 30 years ago! Rev. Rader shared insights into Dale's rela-tionship with people and how he responded to whatever hap-pened during his lifetime, in-cluding the loss of his wife and failing health.

I just want to say a heartfelt thanks to Rev. Rader for his part in the beautiful funeral of our mutual friend, Dale Cope-man. AND one of the most im-portant things I will remember about Dale is the way he always seemed to kinda beam or have a twinkle in his eye when he would see us - like he was really glad to see us. Certainly, we should all beam a little more when we see family and friends, and maybe even strangers, and they will surely feel someone cares about them.

Margaret Lex
Stewartville, MN

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