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Advice to a young man & A couple of things Iím not so sure about


Sun, Oct 22nd, 2000
Posted in

Monday, October 23, 2000

I will begin by telling you that I am seventy-five years of age and that I am a recovering workaholic. I have been in a recovery program for the last fifty five years. I want you to understand that it is not easy for me to talk about my addiction but I do believe that every young person should be advised of the dangers and possible addiction of working.

No matter how attractive the work may appear to be, it must be avoided and the best way to do that is by not going anywhere near it. There are those that will tell you that hard work never hurt anyone; DONíT YOU LISTEN TO THEM! It has been my experience that the panderers of hard work have never done any of it themselves.

Now those of us that are in a recovery program realize that there is no cure for workaholism and that the slightest bit of toil could bring on a total collapse. We will always be what we are and we must accept our lot. If and when work should come our way, we must stand aside and let it pass. It is not for us to do or die and we shall never work while we whistle.

We must realize that while others may do their daily tasks, we must be content with our lot and let them have their fun; for we dare not. Let me leave you with my personal credo: I will never sit when I can lie down and when I go through a revolving door, I let the person ahead of me do the pushing.

A couple of things Iím not so sure about


Much is being said these days about the quality of life versus the length of life. Apparently, it is not how long one lives but how well one lives. Does living well mean that I should go out and see how much fun that I can have? Well, considering the cost of fun today, I couldnít afford it. Aside from that, even if I could afford it, my wife wouldnít let me.

From what they tell me, quality of life means that I should get up in the morning with the thought that today might be my last day on Earth. If that be the case, why get out of bed? I think that what they are trying to tell me is that I should quit sitting around the Elks Club playing cards and go out into the world and do good works and deeds. Well do I want to spend the rest of my life being a do-gooder? How many years are there in a normal life span? If there are sixty to seventy, Iím in trouble. If itís seventy to eighty, itís back to the Elks Club for me. Who would want to live to be a hundred, some people ask? Well, if they really want to know they should ask someone who is ninety-nine.

They say that women live longer than men and perhaps they are right, but has any woman lived as long as Methuselah? They tell me that Methuselah lived to the ripe old age of nine hundred and sixty-nine years. I should think that at nine hundred and sixty-nine years, he would have been over ripe. If what I read is true, most people back in those days made their living by herding sheep. He must have retired at some time; how long would someone care to herd sheep? What do you suppose that he did all day long? Did he go over to the Senior Citizens Tent and play Bingo? Did he go down to the Elks Tent and play cards? Did he sit around and tell those that would listen about the good old days? Did he tell the kids about how tough he had it when he was their age? Probably.

Now let us suppose that the old geezer had been born in the United States. Aside from the fact that he would still be with us doing Talk Shows, just think what havoc he would wreak upon Social Security and Medicare. Itís a good thing that the old boy lived and died when and where he did.

And then there was King Solomon. King Solomon is said, by those who should know, to have been the wisest man to ever to have lived. All of my life I have read and been told of the wisdom of King Solomon. It has also been said, again by those who should know, that King Solomon had two thousand wives. Now I ask you, what wise man would want two thousand mothers-in-law?

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