"Where Fillmore County News Comes First"
Online Edition
Sunday, October 26th, 2014
Volume ∞ Issue ∞
 

Monday, October 23, 2000


Sun, Oct 22nd, 2000
Posted in

To the Editor,

I would like to commend the Journal for continuing the Beyond Today column. You have presented these young writers with a wonderful opportunity.

Thank you for your ongoing commitment to our youth and for putting out an outstanding newspaper.

Mark O'Neill
Mabel, MN


To the Editor,

We are responding to the article Trouble in the Big Woods, in last weeks Journal. The Big Woods are no different than they were twenty years ago. If anything has changed if is from the flood of the spring of 2000 and the logging in the past couple of years. The immigrants that camp and hunt on this land are the reason why the wildlife is disappearing.

Trucks and ATVs have been going through these woods for many years. The farmers that own the land have never complained or posted any trespassing signs before and they have known about this for many years. There hasnt been a problem until Mr. Topness complained and went to his neighbors about this issue. Previously, we have talked to the land owners about passing through the trails that cross their property. They have always told us that it is not a problem as long as we close their gates and dont scare their livestock. As far as Mr. and Mrs. Topness are concerned, the trail doesnt even cross their property.

Just last weekend, we witnessed Mr. Topness and others with him in the Big Woods with trucks and ATVs. So why is Mr. Topness so worried about other people enjoying the trail, when he rides it himself.

One of our concerns is why Mr. Topness didnt invite both sides of the issue to his meeting. Both sides should be presented in front of Larry Nelson, Regional Director of DNR Region 5 Operations; John Kelly, DNR Area Forester; Dan Book, Conservation Officer; Craig Bloomer, DNR Area Supervisor of Trails and Waterways; Kenric Scheevel, State Senator; Greg Davids, State Representative; two Preble township supervisors; and ten local land owners. We would like to have a meeting with the same people that Mr. Topness had spoke to. This way everyone will have the opportunity to tell their side of the story. We saw in the paper that the county commissioners were invited to this meeting. When we spoke to one of the county commissioners, he said that he didnt even know about the meeting that Mr. Topness planned.

Our biggest concern is that we want to work out an agreement with the landowners, DNR, and the State of Minnesota to keep this trail open. We are open for any suggestions. We need to find out what we can do to help this problem without closing the Big Woods. This is the only place close by that us fourwheelers can get to. The snowmobilers and bicyclists all get land and funding from the state for their hobbies, all we are asking is to keep the trail open in the Big Woods.

Drew Linder
Matt Veschio
Rushford, MN

To the Editor,

I would like to commend the Journal for continuing the Beyond Today column. You have presented these young writers with a wonderful opportunity.

Thank you for your ongoing commitment to our youth and for putting out an outstanding newspaper.

Mark O'Neill
Mabel, MN


To the Editor,

We are responding to the article Trouble in the Big Woods, in last weeks Journal. The Big Woods are no different than they were twenty years ago. If anything has changed if is from the flood of the spring of 2000 and the logging in the past couple of years. The immigrants that camp and hunt on this land are the reason why the wildlife is disappearing.

Trucks and ATVs have been going through these woods for many years. The farmers that own the land have never complained or posted any trespassing signs before and they have known about this for many years. There hasnt been a problem until Mr. Topness complained and went to his neighbors about this issue. Previously, we have talked to the land owners about passing through the trails that cross their property. They have always told us that it is not a problem as long as we close their gates and dont scare their livestock. As far as Mr. and Mrs. Topness are concerned, the trail doesnt even cross their property.

Just last weekend, we witnessed Mr. Topness and others with him in the Big Woods with trucks and ATVs. So why is Mr. Topness so worried about other people enjoying the trail, when he rides it himself.

One of our concerns is why Mr. Topness didnt invite both sides of the issue to his meeting. Both sides should be presented in front of Larry Nelson, Regional Director of DNR Region 5 Operations; John Kelly, DNR Area Forester; Dan Book, Conservation Officer; Craig Bloomer, DNR Area Supervisor of Trails and Waterways; Kenric Scheevel, State Senator; Greg Davids, State Representative; two Preble township supervisors; and ten local land owners. We would like to have a meeting with the same people that Mr. Topness had spoke to. This way everyone will have the opportunity to tell their side of the story. We saw in the paper that the county commissioners were invited to this meeting. When we spoke to one of the county commissioners, he said that he didnt even know about the meeting that Mr. Topness planned.

Our biggest concern is that we want to work out an agreement with the landowners, DNR, and the State of Minnesota to keep this trail open. We are open for any suggestions. We need to find out what we can do to help this problem without closing the Big Woods. This is the only place close by that us fourwheelers can get to. The snowmobilers and bicyclists all get land and funding from the state for their hobbies, all we are asking is to keep the trail open in the Big Woods.

Drew Linder
Matt Veschio
Rushford, MN

To the Editor,

Your October 2nd issue carried an exciting article by our prominent author, Neil Haugerud, about the endangered species, commonly called The Jackelope.

Then came your October 16th issue with a most scholarly and carefully researched letter written by our learned naturalist, John P. Levell. Mr. Levell interestingly covered a mutation of the jackelope, the extremely rare jackadeer.

Even after these two prominent local men confirmed the existence of these rare beasts, there may still be some scoffers who remain unconvinced that these exceptional animals exist.

Let me tell such skeptics that, yes, they do really exist. How do I know? I shall tell you.

My distant cousin Harry, over the years, developed a healthy taste and appetite for demon rum of any variety. Every Saturday night he would lurch home after lustily slaking his substantial thirst.

Finally, his long-suffering wife, Marie, threatened to leave him unless they both visited Doc Breeden about what Marie described as Harrys drinking problem.

After listening carefully to Maries woeful recital of Harrys behavior, Doc Breeden levelled with Harry. The good Doc advised Harry that, unless he lightened up substantially on his drinking, he would soon suffer the D.T.s. Harry then asked Doc what the D.T.s were and Doc replied that there were a serious medical condition known as the delirium tremens.

Harrys hearing aid batteries were almost gone and he thought he had heard the good Doc warn him about delicious treemen. Harry thought no more about Doc Breedens warning and, after all, what did a doctor know about the fine recreational values of drinking a cup of booze now and then?

The next Saturday night was a beautiful October night with a full moon shining brightly on Harry as he weaved down the road, taking both sides of the street to ambulate.

All of a sudden, Harry heard an eerie ear-piercing wailing. Turning around, suddenly, he saw half a dozen brightly green-eyed delicious treemen driving a herd of about 300 jackelopes right down the street at him. Harry shrieked in terror and raced toward the safety of a ditch to escape the menacing jackelopes. How he survived this episode, Harry never knew, but he knows for sure that there are jackelopes. In his terror, he had seen them and they had ruthlessly chased him in the bright light of the full Minnesota Halloween October moon.

There is no question about the existence of jackelopes and if you ever see my Uncle Harry, he will tell you all about it.

Ray Hanson
Lanesboro, MN


To the Editor

There has been much discussion among landowners and hunters in recent weeks about how the DNR enforces trespass law on those lands that are enrolled in conservation programs. Unfortunately, that discussion seems to have created considerable confusion, so allow me to explain what we are doing.

The key question seems to be whether lands enrolled in CRP, CREP and RIM Reserve need to be posted. The answer is, "It depends." When enforcing trespass law on un-posted conservation program lands, DNR Conservation Officers must make the same determinations they make with all trespass complaints. One of the things the officer will do is evaluate the appearance of the land to determine whether it qualifies as agricultural land under Minnesota state statute. The decision on whether to charge someone with criminal trespass is based on that statutory standard as found in the Outdoor Recreation Trespass Law, and the facts and circumstances of each case.

Whether the land is agricultural is important because under that law it is illegal under most circumstances to enter agricultural land without permission, even when the land is not posted. The determination that the land is or is not agricultural must be made at each location. That decision is based on the characteristics of the land, not on whether the land is enrolled in a conservation program. In other words, whether or not the land is enrolled in CRP, CREP or RIM Reserve is not a legal consideration for determining whether someone is in violation of the Outdoor Recreation Trespass Law.

Agricultural land in Minnesota is defined by the Outdoor Recreation Trespass Law as land that is 1) tilled or plowed, 2) has standing crops or crop residue, or 3) is within a maintained fence for enclosing domestic livestock. Conservation program lands are typically planted in grasses and as they revert to their natural state (as intended under those programs) they appear less and less like traditional agricultural lands. Therefore, they may not meet the definition of agricultural lands under the Outdoor Recreation Trespass Law.

The law does not give someone the right to enter private land without permission. The DNR has long urged hunters and other recreationists to ask first. It's a

No Comments Yet. Be the first to comment!







Your comment submission is also an acknowledgement that this information may be reprinted in other formats such as the newspaper.