"Where Fillmore County News Comes First"
Online Edition
Monday, October 20th, 2014
Volume ∞ Issue ∞
 

To the Editor,


Sun, Nov 5th, 2000
Posted in

Two women are devoting a lot of their time trying to perfect our democracy. Doris Haddock (Granny D, 90 years old) walked from Pasedena to the U.S. Capital. After quoting to a rally at the capital steps from the U.S. Code Title 18, Chapter 11, Section 201: Bribery of public officials; the audience was not shocked by her comment that most of the people who make laws in these buildings to send other people to jail, should themselves be in jail. Granny D, like a growing majority, believes so much money flowing to candidates and parties -- $3 billion in this election cycle -- is too close to, if not, bribery and subverts our democracy.

Ellen Miller, president of Public Campaign, in a recent letter pointed out that over the past few years, the pharmaceutical industry has shelled out to Senators and Congressmen an estimated $13 million in campaign contributions. Their goal? To block enactment of a prescription drug benefit under Medicare. In 1998, major players in the investment industry weighed in with more than $37 million. They have an interest in privatizing Social Security. When Money Magazine added up the cost of all the special deals for special interests, it concluded that they are costing Americans a total of $1600 per person per year.

A Clean Public Money system for Congressional elections would cost about $1.3 billion per election cycle or about $6.50 per taxpayer per year. A Clean Money system for Minnesota state office elections would cost about $12.6 million, less than $5 per person.

Ellen Miller and Public Campaign want laws that allow candidates to be able to voluntarily choose public funds in exchange for refusing private donations and limiting expenditures. Not expecting much from Congress, Public Campaign helped Maine pass a clean money bill in 1996 and Vermont, Massachusetts and Arizona two years later and is helping Clean Money bills move forward in many other states including Minnesota. You should be asking candidates where they stand on this important issue.

In 1996, health care interests in Minnesota gave $171,000 to legislative leaders and they were able to block citizens efforts to pass strong new health care protections. In the same year Minnesota political parties received $259,000 from banking and finance and several bills since have been introduced to curb ATM costs but none have been allowed to come to a floor vote. Customers now pay an average surcharge of $1.27 on each ATM withdrawal that costs banks less than 25 cents compared to $2.93 for transactions processed by human tellers.


Robert K. Johnson
Harmony, MN

Two women are devoting a lot of their time trying to perfect our democracy. Doris Haddock (Granny D, 90 years old) walked from Pasedena to the U.S. Capital. After quoting to a rally at the capital steps from the U.S. Code Title 18, Chapter 11, Section 201: Bribery of public officials; the audience was not shocked by her comment that most of the people who make laws in these buildings to send other people to jail, should themselves be in jail. Granny D, like a growing majority, believes so much money flowing to candidates and parties -- $3 billion in this election cycle -- is too close to, if not, bribery and subverts our democracy.

Ellen Miller, president of Public Campaign, in a recent letter pointed out that over the past few years, the pharmaceutical industry has shelled out to Senators and Congressmen an estimated $13 million in campaign contributions. Their goal? To block enactment of a prescription drug benefit under Medicare. In 1998, major players in the investment industry weighed in with more than $37 million. They have an interest in privatizing Social Security. When Money Magazine added up the cost of all the special deals for special interests, it concluded that they are costing Americans a total of $1600 per person per year.

A Clean Public Money system for Congressional elections would cost about $1.3 billion per election cycle or about $6.50 per taxpayer per year. A Clean Money system for Minnesota state office elections would cost about $12.6 million, less than $5 per person.

Ellen Miller and Public Campaign want laws that allow candidates to be able to voluntarily choose public funds in exchange for refusing private donations and limiting expenditures. Not expecting much from Congress, Public Campaign helped Maine pass a clean money bill in 1996 and Vermont, Massachusetts and Arizona two years later and is helping Clean Money bills move forward in many other states including Minnesota. You should be asking candidates where they stand on this important issue.

In 1996, health care interests in Minnesota gave $171,000 to legislative leaders and they were able to block citizens efforts to pass strong new health care protections. In the same year Minnesota political parties received $259,000 from banking and finance and several bills since have been introduced to curb ATM costs but none have been allowed to come to a floor vote. Customers now pay an average surcharge of $1.27 on each ATM withdrawal that costs banks less than 25 cents compared to $2.93 for transactions processed by human tellers.


Robert K. Johnson
Harmony, MN

No Comments Yet. Be the first to comment!







Your comment submission is also an acknowledgement that this information may be reprinted in other formats such as the newspaper.