Letterwerks Sign City
 
"Where Fillmore County News Comes First"
Online Edition
Sunday, September 25th, 2016
Volume ∞ Issue ∞
 
< | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | > | >>

Recycling 101 - 2.8.16


By LaVerne C. Paulson

Mon, Feb 8th, 2016
Posted in All Home & Garden

By LaVerne C. Paulson

Recycling Education Coordinator

Today’s tin cans, as we know them, are not made of tin, but are actually made of steel. Tin cans that were really made of tin were being used in the early 1800s to keep foods from spoiling as settlers traveled across the country. Today, we purchase soup, juice, vegetables, meat, coffee, evaporated milk, sardines, pork and beans, and pet food in cans. Perhaps the second best thing about tin cans is they don’t usually break when you drop them. To a recycler, their finest quality is the fact that they are highly recyclable.

One of the most common recycled metal products made with iron is the steel food can. These cans are 99% steel. They are made of steel for strength, but are coated with tin to stabilize the flavors of the can’s contents. Without this coating, the food in the can would most likely taste of metal. If you remove the label from a can after you have removed the food, you will most likely notice the inside of almost all cans is a different color than the outside. Food is actually cooked in the steel can during the canning process. Food cans made of aluminum would not withstand the high temperatures needed for canning most foods.

All steel food and beverage cans are 100% recyclable, including the somewhat uncommon bi-metal cans, the ones with the steel bodies and the aluminum ends. When a steel can is recycled, it is shredded and run through a series of washing solutions and filtered. Since steel food cans contain both steel and tin, the recycling process (melting and filtering) must separate the molten tin and steel by “detinning”. This process yields high grade steel and tin, and new steel cans with a shiny, thin tin coating are produced.

The cans with the aluminum ends are also melted and made into new steel. However, the aluminum is not separated from the recycled steel, as is the tin, but enhances the process of making new steel cans. Recycled steel is used to build cars, trucks, bridges, trains, train tracks, jets, dumpsters, fences, siding and roofs for buildings, as well as the nuts and bolts that hold them together.

The recycling of steel cans is quite beneficial. It takes 75% less energy to recycle steel than to produce steel from iron ore. For every pound of steel recycled, the energy it takes to light a 60 watt light bulb for more than 26 hours is saved. Through recycling, the steel industry .....
[Read the Rest]

Recycling 101

By LaVerne C. Paulson

Mon, Jan 25th, 2016
Posted in All Home & Garden

This article is scheduled to be published near the end of January, but it is still not too late to modify some of your recycling habits. I am quite sure that a majority of the residents of Fillmore County who recycle, do so quite well. Some, inclu ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Sharps and meds disposal

By LaVerne C. Paulson

Mon, Jan 11th, 2016
Posted in All Home & Garden

Questions concerning the proper disposal of used sharps and unwanted medicine are frequently asked. Today we will review safe methods to dispose of these items correctly. Hypodermic needles, lancets, and syringes that are used for injecting insul ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Recycling 101 12.21.15

By LaVerne C. Paulson

Mon, Dec 21st, 2015
Posted in All Home & Garden

Keep America Beautiful, one of the stronger supporters of recycling has recently informed us of the Top 10 Things to Recycle in Your Home. Here they are. In your home office, office paper. In your bedroom, tissue boxes and magazines. In your bath ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Recycling 101

By LaVerne C. Paulson

Mon, Dec 7th, 2015
Posted in All Home & Garden

By LaVerne C. Paulson Recycling Education Coordinator Reduce... Reuse... Recycle. Most of us realize if we are going to recycle correctly, we must also reduce and reuse. Today’s article will deal mostly with the reduce part, and will have very ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Recycling 101 ... 11.16.15

By LaVerne C. Paulson

Mon, Nov 16th, 2015
Posted in All Home & Garden

By LaVerne C. Paulson Recycling Education Coordinator On September 22, Minneapolis based WCCO shared three interesting statements with us that I would like to pass on to you at this time. (1) A new survey by Yale University estimates that Americ ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Recycling 101

By LaVerne C. Paulson

Mon, Nov 9th, 2015
Posted in All Home & Garden

On November 15, America Recycles Day will be observed throughout the United States. This marks the seventeenth year of this celebration. There will be very few parades, special foods eaten, or speeches given. However, it a day when each of us sho ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Recycling 101

By LaVerne C. Paulson

Mon, Oct 26th, 2015
Posted in All Home & Garden

The residents of Fillmore County took advantage of a beautiful autumn day to participate in the Household Hazardous Waste Collection on October 6. Nearly three hundred households contributed to the cause, dropping off all kinds of nasty stuff they ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Tasty Temptations “Best Cooks of Bluff Country”

Mon, Oct 12th, 2015
Posted in All Home & Garden

On October 27, 2015, the Best Cook of Bluff Country will share their recipes for a chance of winning 1st, 2nd, or 3rd place in nine different categories for a grand total payout of $630. This event, including all prizes, is sponsored by Harmony Food ..... 
[Read the Rest]
< | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | > | >>