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A View from The Potting Bench


Fri, Apr 9th, 2004
Posted in Features

This week our rhubarb patch started showing its first growth. The bits of curly red new leaves among the remains of last years plants bring a promise of tasty treats in the near future. I was tickled to notice that Rhubarb is currently a “trendy” food item, featured in magazines and on TV shows like it is something “new”! I also giggled in recent weeks at the 70’s revisit in clothing on display in stores. Been there, done that! Rhubarb, unlike the clothing styles and the thoughts of the food editors, has remained reliably timeless often passed on from friends and family. There are few yards without this hassle free perennial throughout this area.

Rhubarb is a vegetable. It has a tangy taste that makes it a favorite in many tasty goodies. It originated in Asia thousands of years ago, it was first cultivated for its medicinal qualities. It was not until the 18th century that rhubarb was grown for culinary purposes in Britain and America. Rhubarb is often commonly mistaken to be a fruit but rhubarb is actually a close relative of garden sorrel in the buckwheat family, and is therefore a member of the vegetable family.

Rhubarb roots are best transplanted in early spring. Roots should be planted 30-48 inches apart as mature plants can grow to an amazing size. Plant the roots with the top buds 2 inches below the surface of the soil. Dig an extra large hole for these plants. Feed the soil well as Rhubarb is a heavy feeder. Add composted manure and peat moss to the dug hole. Well drained soil is a must for rhubarb. Once planted well these plants will last many years. Do not pick this new Rhubarb until the plant is into it’s second year and is well established.

Mature Rhubarb tolerates considerable neglect. However it does much better with regular watering and attention. Fertilize each spring. One to two shovels full of well composted manure per plant is beneficial. Remove the flowering stalks promptly, as soon as they start growing. These seed making flower stalks take away energy from the rest of the plant. Established clumps should be thinned when the stalks get small and spindly or when the crown is visibly crowded.

Harvest Rhubarb as soon as the stalks are of a good size. Don’t cut the Rhubarb stalks from the plant, but instead snap them off. They will break away easily and this is much better for the plant. Grab a stalk right down near the ground, and use a sort of roc .....
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Another View: Water problems at courthouse over stated

Fri, Apr 9th, 2004
Posted in Features

The local media reported on the March 9 Fillmore County Board meeting that dealt extensively with roof leaks on the courthouse project. It is my opinion that Hill Roofing of Austin, the contractor on the project, is being blamed for things it is not ..... 
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Snowshoe Thompson

Fri, Apr 2nd, 2004
Posted in Features

One of the benefits of doing genealogical research is discovering new family connections. Such was the case when my research led me to Snowshoe Thompson, a Norwegian emigrant who became a mail-carrying hero to the gold miners of the Sierra Nevada Mou ..... 
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Moose pleads guilty to attempted murder

Fri, Apr 2nd, 2004
Posted in Features

Richard Jeffers was inspecting a landscaping job in the Conway Subdivision of Chatfield last May 23 when a man walked out of the weeds carrying a gun.

After asking Jeffers what he was doing, the gunman told him, “Let’s get movin ..... 
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Judge considers motion to stop Heartland construction

Fri, Apr 2nd, 2004
Posted in Features

An Olmsted District Court judge will consider whether construction of a tire-burning power plant in Preston should be allowed to proceed while the project undergoes additional environmental review.

Judge Joseph Wieners took und ..... 
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County to observe Child Abuse Prevention month

Fri, Apr 2nd, 2004
Posted in Features

At their March 23 commissioners’ meeting, the Fillmore County Board proclaimed April Child Abuse Prevention Month.

“Child Abuse Services (CAS) is a mandated state program that the county must provide,” Fillmore County Social Ser ..... 
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Jury finds Moose not guilty of fleeing a police officer

Fri, Mar 26th, 2004
Posted in Features

On Tuesday, a jury of seven men and five women found Floyd Moose of Chatfield not guilty on seven charges related to an incident on January 14, 2003.

According to the criminal complaint, Moose was alleged to have been the drive ..... 
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Davids signs on to bill requiring EIS for tire plants

Fri, Mar 26th, 2004
Posted in Features

On Monday, March 22, Rep. Greg Davids signed on to a bill authored by DFL Rep. Margaret Anderson-Kelliher that would require an environmental impact statement be prepared for any tire burning facility that uses fluidized bed boiler system technology. ..... 
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Rushford City Council Report: “Gamma Log” days in Rushford

Fri, Mar 26th, 2004
Posted in Features

No, it’s not a take-off on Peterson’s Gammel Dag, but rather days when the city of Rushford will literally delve deeply into current well number three and its ability to supply good water to the residents of Rushford.

The City ..... 
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