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Scottish Highland cattle more than an exotic pet


Fri, Feb 13th, 2004
Posted in Features

Nestled snugly into the hills near Money Creek in Houston County is a very unique farm that raises an interesting breed of cattle. Owned and operated by Paul and Terry Preston, Arrow Valley Farm is the home to an ancient breed of cattle known as Scottish Highlands.

Highlanders, as they are also called, originally came from Scotland and are said to be one of the oldest registered breeds of cattle. A herd book was created in the 1880’s and soon after that the cattle were being brought to North America. Naturally adapted to the harsh, rugged conditions of the Scottish Highlands, the cattle are ideally suited to practically any climate, especially the colder northern ones.

The Prestons got their first cattle in the early 1990’s, and their herd has grown ever since. Now the couple has almost fifty head.

“I’ve been around cattle all my life,” says Paul, “but Highlanders were the choice.”

He jokingly adds “Our second date was looking at cows.” “In the dark,” comments his wife Terry.

When visiting Arrow Valley farm, the Preston’s devotion to their cattle is evident. All of them have names such as Auburn, Moon Shadow, and (many visitors favorite three) Pony, Sony and I.

Highlanders are very docile and easy to be around. Paul and Terry are able to pet most of their cattle, and some even come up to them with that sole purpose in mind. They are very curious bovines, and have a personality all their own. On the rare occasion that they become spooked, they bolt almost like an Arabian horse. Their head goes up, their tail cocks, and they look like they have an almost arrogant air to them as they run. They also possess surprising speed and agility which aids them if they are harassed by predators.

Scottish Highlands come in a variety of colors, and were once separated into two groups because of this. The island cattle were usually all black or brindle, and the mainland cattle were a reddish color. Nowadays the most common color is the reddish one, but there are also blacks, brindles, and whites. Their thick coat of long hair makes the Highlander ideal for cold climates. Breeders are located in Alaska, Canada and the Scandinavian countries as well as mainland Europe.

In the summer they shed down to a soft, downy layer that keeps them cool in the heat, making them compatible for warmer souther .....
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Heartland given building permit

Fri, Feb 13th, 2004
Posted in Features

“I think the value of my home just went down $20,000,” Rev. Frances Galles, a retired Catholic priest from Preston told Elaine Maust, smiling sheepishly.

“I think it just went up by $20,000,” Maust countered good naturedly.[Read the Rest]

Harmony City Council Report: Delinquent utility, ambulance, and fire call charges require action

Fri, Feb 13th, 2004
Posted in Features

With more than $11,000 worth of outstanding ambulance and fire call charges, and several delinquent utility bills floating on Harmony’s accounting records, council members took an official stand as City Administrator Jerome Illg stressed the need to ..... 
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Fillmore County District Court

Fri, Feb 13th, 2004
Posted in Features

Felony Charges

•Jason Allen Kniseley, 20, of Rushford, was charged with one felony count of criminal damage to property in the first degree, stemming from a domestic dispute in Rushford on November 25, 2003. Kniseley has also be ..... 
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Rushford City Council Report: Standby generator permit okayed

Fri, Feb 13th, 2004
Posted in Features

Another step was taken in the process of building standby electric generation in Rushford when, at the February 9th Rushford City Council meeting, City Administrator Larry Bartelson announced the MPCA had granted the permit for Rushford’s standby gen ..... 
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Ibsen’s Rosmersholm strikes contemporary theme

Fri, Feb 13th, 2004
Posted in Features

As far as I know, I have not one drop of Norwegian blood. But living in Minnesota, I am Norwegian by association.

So I was as pleased as the next guy when Eric Lorentz Bunge spoke a few phrases in the mother tongue as he introdu ..... 
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Commissioners’ Report: Fillmore County to develop methamphetamine ordinance

Fri, Feb 13th, 2004
Posted in Features

“Toxic waste problems have long lasting effects,” emphasized Sharon Serfling, Director of Public Health and Sheriff Jim Connolly as they opened up discussion regarding the county’s need to develop a methamphetamine ordinance.

T ..... 
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County’s purchase policy reviewed

Fri, Feb 13th, 2004
Posted in Features

During the reviewing of weekly warrants a few weeks ago, a $3,200 bill for an air conditioning unit purchased by the Sheriff’s Department was flagged. The commissioners challenged the bill noting, in their opinion that all departments must receive ap ..... 
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Ski jumping was once a familiar winter sporting event in the area

Fri, Feb 6th, 2004
Posted in Features

Sometime in the 1800’s (or even before that) one Norwegian told another Norwegian that he could ski down a mountain, jump off a jump, and fly farther than the other Norwegian.

So, mythologically speaking, was born the sport of ..... 
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