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Education is for the common good


Fri, Aug 19th, 2011
Posted in Commentary

"Education is at the foundation of this economy; I personally believe that one of the most effective ways that we can help the economy is making sure that we're not seeing more teacher layoffs - because we can't eat our seed corn. We can't shortchange investments in the future, and no investment is more important than education."

-President Barack Obama in Cannon Falls, August 15, 2011

At the forum in Cannon Falls which I was able to attend, I listened to President Obama speak on rural issues. I was struck by the similarities to what my parents taught us about the importance of a good education system for our families, our communities, and our economy.

It is for the common good to educate those who will be the future work force: business owners, nurses, doctors, lawyers, teachers and those who farm the land. They will be paying for our generation's social security, fighting for our protection, diagnosing our illnesses, researching for better medical care, and producing our food and renewable fuels in the future.

Can we afford to shortchange them from getting a good education now?

My mother, Ruby Jones wrote in a letter to the editor years ago: "Our responsibility to educate our nation's children is lifelong. Even though my children are through school, it is important to keep a viable education system for the next generation. Remember, the generation before you helped to educate your children and so it goes."

The national system of public education in the United States was developed in the 19th century. Thomas Jefferson was the first American leader to propose a public school system. Jefferson believed that education should be under the control of the government, free from religious biases, and available to all people irrespective of their status in society. Until the 1840s, the education system was limited and available only to wealthy people. Noah Webster and George Washington, among others, wanted all children to gain the benefits of education. As a result of their efforts, free public education at the elementary level was available for all American children by the end of the 19th century.

The rise in American high school attendance was one of the most striking developments in U.S. education during the 20th century. From 1900 to 1996 the percentage of teenagers who graduated from high school increased from about 6 percent to about 85 percent.

The benefits of public education are priceless .....
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Obama in the garden

Fri, Aug 19th, 2011
Posted in Commentary

It started about ten days before the event. A colleague got a call from a friend who works for Congress, looking for some farms between Decorah and Preston which might be good locations for a tour. We didn't know who was coming or what they were int ..... 
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One Moment Please... Making history

Fri, Aug 19th, 2011
Posted in Commentary

Publisher of the

Fillmore County Journal

Cell phone: 507-251-5297

Based on the front page, does this newspaper look like it was sponsored by the "Obama in 2012" presidential campaign? Maybe I should have changed the masthead of ..... 
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America's financial troubles

Fri, Aug 12th, 2011
Posted in Commentary

America is in very serious financial trouble. Government spending is unsustainable and completely out of control. Yet politicians, especially liberal politicians, seem to think they can create an alternate reality by just continuing to spend more an ..... 
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Correction to August 8th Commentary

Fri, Aug 12th, 2011
Posted in Commentary

In the commentary by Dr. Robert Sauer in the August 8 Fillmore County Journal, it was stated that the tax increases of 1983 made under Ronald Reagan were the largest in American history. It should have read they were the largest peace time tax incre ..... 
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Choosing Mediocrity and Greed

Fri, Aug 5th, 2011
Posted in Commentary

By Dr. Robert Sauer

Before Governor Dayton capitulated to demands the state continue to operate on a budget that excoriates the backs of lower income Minnesotans' I wrote a commentary on the reasonableness of his proposals. They were based br ..... 
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Growth and grassless yards

Fri, Jul 29th, 2011
Posted in Commentary

We were in the midst of the worst heat wave in ten years, forecast to last at least a week. On the first Saturday of this stretch, my husband Art, his sister Susie and I traveled to Minneapolis to visit Art and Susie's brother Bob and his wife Bonni ..... 
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City mouse, country mouse

Fri, Jul 22nd, 2011
Posted in Commentary

I only recently realized, after living in these lovely hills for five years, that natives saying "they're from the cities" is not just an introduction, it's an inside curse. In these five years I've made many good friends and we have been able to le ..... 
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It's not JUST the budget

Fri, Jul 15th, 2011
Posted in Commentary

As I began to write this commentary for the Journal, the State of Minnesota has been shut down due to failures of the legislative and executive branches to come to an agreement on finances. The reasons for this dilemma could be as simple as the past ..... 
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