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Grain drowning


Fri, Sep 17th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture



Grain bins, gravity flow wagons, and trucks are involved in grain suffocations or grain "drownings" each year. Grain that flows out from the bottom through an auger or by gravity is much like quicksand. An adult can be pulled under the grain's surface in a matter of seconds and small children can also be quickly suffocated. Keep children out of bins, wagons, and trucks. If you have to enter a bin to check storage conditions, shut off and lock out all unloading equipment. And treat the bin as you would any dangerous, confined space.

Increased storage capacities, larger and faster handling capacities and automation contribute to many potentially hazardous situations during the harvest and storage season. Today's large augers can transfer from two to four times as much grain as the augers of the past. Also, using automated equipment often means a farmer works alone most of the time.

Suffocation, resulting from grain drowning, is probably one of the most common causes of death in and around grain bins. These accidents typically occur when the victim enters a bin of flowing grain, is unaware of the potential hazard, and is pulled under and covered with grain in a few seconds.

The typical round, flat-bottomed grain bin draws grain from the top center and forms a vertical cone when emptying. The 8-inch auger, common on many farms, can transfer 3,000 cubic feet of grain per hour (52 cubic feet per minute). Your body volume, which is about seven cubic feet, can be completely submerged in grain in about eight seconds. Because of the tremendous force flowing grain exerts on your body, you are totally helpless to escape once you are trapped knee-deep in the grain.

Crusted, spoiled grain can also result in grain bin suffocation. As grain is removed from the bin, a cavity develops under the crusted surface. Unsuspecting victims walk on the crusted grain, break through, become submerged in the grain, and suffocate.

If you become trapped in a bin of flowing grain with nothing to hold onto, but you are still able to walk, stay near the outside wall. Keep walking until the bin is empty or grain flow stops. Also, if you are covered by flowing grain, cup your hands over your mouth, and take short breaths. This may keep you alive until help arrives.

Suffocation doesn't have to happen. Follow these safety rules to protect yourself and others: Never enter a bin when unloading equipment is running, whether or not grain is .....
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64

Local angus breeders recognized to owning proven bulls

Fri, Sep 17th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

Rein Angus Farm, owns one bull, Julie Ann Abrahamson, owns two bulls and Philip Abrahamson, also owns two bulls listed in the 2010 Fall Sire Evaluation Report published by the American Angus Association® in Saint Joseph, Mo. All three breeders ..... 
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Forest invasive species

Fri, Sep 17th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

Are you worried about invasive species like buckthorn, emerald ash borer, garlic mustard, and gypsy moth on your property? If so this class is for you. Participants will learn how to identify invasive species of concern in southeast Minnesota. Durin ..... 
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Time to chop corn silage

Fri, Aug 27th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture



There was a lot of talk at the Houston County Fair about of how fast the crops are maturing this summer. Looking at the latest Crop Weather report from Minnesota Ag News, I see Preston is the farthest ahead of normal of any spot in Minnesota ..... 
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Cover crop project targeting corn and soybean growers

Fri, Aug 27th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

FAIRMONT, Minn. (07/14/2010) - Rural Advantage, in partnership with Practical Farmers of Iowa, is seeking agricultural producers interested in utilizing cover crops. Cost-share dollars are available. Priority will be given to corn, grain and soybean ..... 
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Ash seed for the future

Fri, Aug 20th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been attacking and killing ash trees in the United States. This insect, originally from Asia, was first found in southeastern Michigan. It has spread to several states, including Houston County in SE Minnesota.
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Corn silage concerns with hail damaged corn

Fri, Aug 20th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture



Although the areas of recent hail damage were not large and were very scattered, where hail did strike, the damage was severe. The question becomes, "How to best use this corn?" Corn silage is certainly one option.

The hail damage in ..... 
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Badgersett Farm Annual Field Day - Saturday, August 21st; All Day

Fri, Aug 13th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

Badgersett Research Farm, in SE Minnesota, is holding its 2010 Field Day on Aug. 21st.

Badgersett has been inventing and developing what many say is the most promising of new "alternative and sustainable" crops, for over 30 years - hybrid haze ..... 
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Scouting fields for soybean aphids

Fri, Aug 13th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

While many of us were enjoying the Fillmore County Fair, the summer crew from the Extension Regional Office, working with regional crop Extension Educator Lisa Behnken, Ryan Miller, and IPM Specialist Fritz Breitenbach, were out scouting for soybean ..... 
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