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Buckthorn keeps coming back


Fri, Nov 5th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture



Buckthorn is not the only invasive species we have in southeast Minnesota, but having seen and heard Angela Gupta, University of Minnesota Regional Extension Educator for Forestry, at both the Woodland Advisor-Tree ID class near Caledonia and the Small Farm U in Winona, it is the most talked about.

Most of the native trees and shrubs found in woodlots, fencerows, windbreaks and forest edges have lost their leaves. There is one exception; the leaves of common buckthorn are still green and clinging to the branches and twigs of the plants. The green leaves on large masses of buckthorn make it easy to see just how invasive this woody plant is.

Adding to its invasive qualities is the fact that it serves as an alternate host to crown rust of oats and as an overwintering site for the soybean aphid. Soybean aphids lay their last eggs of the season on buckthorn plants, leaving them to overwinter and hatch in the spring.

Common buckthorn has dark green leaves with curved main veins that remain green in the fall after other species have lost their foliage. The twigs are tipped with a short, sharp thorn and the female plants produce blue-black berries that have numerous seeds. The berries are toxic to humans but are readily eaten by birds and, having a laxative effect, the seeds are readily spread from place to place.

Late autumn and winter is an excellent time to control common buckthorn. It is easy to identify because of its green leaves and chemical treatments are more effective when the buckthorn plants are storing energy.

If there are only a few buckthorn plants and they are small enough, hand pulling is the best way to remove them. A tool such as a "Weed Wrench" can be used to remove buckthorn stems up to 2 ½ inches in diameter. If they are too numerous to pull or dig, the foliage can be sprayed with a product like Garlon 3A which is a Triclopyr amine formulation that is mixed with water or any of the Triclopyr products that are available from local sources (Bush-B-Gone, Brush and Stump Killer and others). Glyphosate (Roundup and similar products) can also be used for foliar applications on seedlings, but is non-selective and will kill all vegetation.

If the plants are too large for foliar application, cut them off at a height of six inches or less from the ground and treat the stumps with Triclopyr or Glyphosate to prevent resprouting. When using Triclopyr, treat only the cut surface using a wick a .....
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64

Leiding sisters recognized in dairy showcase

Mon, Oct 25th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

St. Paul, MN -- Haely Leiding of Fillmore County, placed 10th overall in the second year of the Minnesota 4-H Dairy Showcase. Her sister, Kayla Leiding, placed 14th overall in the second year of the Minnesota 4-H Dairy Schowcase. Twenty-five youth w ..... 
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Luther College to compete in Campus Conservation Nationals

Mon, Oct 25th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

DECORAH, Iowa-Luther College will compete in Campus Conservation Nationals, Nov. 1-19, participating in the first real-time, nationwide electricity and water use reduction competition.

Luther students will compete against students from 40 le ..... 
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Minnesota Pork Production Pigs - by the numbers

Fri, Oct 15th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

Minnesota pork producers are part of a progressive and innovative industry. The men and women involved in swine production provide a nutritional protein source to domestic and international markets, and their businesses generate billions of dollars ..... 
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U of M research opportunities

Fri, Oct 15th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

By Jerrold Tesmer, Extension Educator for Fillmore/Houston Counties

I have been contacted by three individuals at the University of Minnesota looking for on-farm research sites in southeast Minnesota. If any of the projects described below st ..... 
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Ventilate and take other safety measures to prevent manure pit explosions

Fri, Oct 15th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

In several recent incidents in Minnesota and Iowa, explosions or flash fires have occurred in livestock buildings with manure pits. The explosions have, to date, mainly resulted in building damage, with few animal losses and no personal injuries or ..... 
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Free manure spreader calibrations available from the SWCD

Fri, Oct 15th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture

The Fillmore Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) reminds livestock producers that the SWCD offers free manure spreader calibrations. Fall is a good time to calibrate spreaders when manure is being applied to fields after harvest. The calibra ..... 
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Fall tillage management in wet soil conditions

Fri, Oct 8th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture



Last Thursday, while watching the rain, the thoughts of an early easy harvest came to an end. I came across some information prepared by Crops Regional Educator Jodi DeJong-Hughes and Extension Agronomist Jeff Coulter in 2009. They addressed ..... 
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Small farm U

Fri, Oct 8th, 2010
Posted in Agriculture



Times are tough, and maybe you are looking for an inexpensive small business venture on your land. Or, maybe you just need an engrossing hobby?

Either way, consider learning about some of your options at "Small Farm U" - Small Farm U ..... 
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