"Where Fillmore County News Comes First"
Online Edition
Wednesday, March 4th, 2015
Volume ∞ Issue ∞
 
<< | < | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | > | >>

Want to improve your pastures? Treat them like a crop.


Fri, Jan 18th, 2013
Posted in All Agriculture

Grazing Specialists John Zinn, NRCS and Dean Thomas, SWCD

Were you dissatisfied with the production of some of your pastures last year, even though you were rotating them and not overgrazing? It could be that your soil is deficient in nutrients. Perhaps it is time to consider interseeding to add more species into your pasture, particularly legumes.

INTERSEEDING:

Adding more species to your pastures can make your pasture more productive. If your pastures are short of clovers or other legumes you might see a bump in production because they fix Nitrogen for the grasses. There are a number of ways to add legumes to pasture. Before interseeding ask yourself, “Are weeds a problem in this pasture?” If the answer is yes, consider controlling the weeds before doing anything else. If you use an herbicide, make sure that carryover won’t kill the legumes you want to establish.

Frost seeding uses the freezing and thawing action of the soil to incorporate seeds. Broadcasting seeds on top of the ground, typically in February or March, is the usual method, but it can be used any time the ground is thawing during the day and freezing at night. Red clover and white clover adapt best to frost seeding because they are vigorous seedlings. A typical minimum seeding rate is 6 pounds of an improved red clover and 2 pounds of an improved white clover per acre. Increase rates when grass competition is high. Don’t seed on top of large amounts of snow as the seed may wash away. Pastures that have been grazed short the previous year are the best sites because the grass competition will be reduced. Use flash grazing after seeding to suppress the grasses and allow legumes to establish. This method has the least predictable results because weather conditions influence the soil seed contact and germination. It may be the only option where the pasture is steep, rough or rocky.

No-till seeding is the most reliable way to add legumes to pasture but is limited to ground that is uniform, free from rocks, stones, and not excessively steep. It can be done first thing in the spring when the ground is dry enough for travel. To work best the drill must be adjusted to place the seeds ¼ to ½” deep and a drill with press wheels is desirable to insure good soil seed contact. Although red and white clover works best other species may be added because there is better soil to seed contact. Use rates comparable to the ful .....
[Read the Rest]



64

Revision of the State’s Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Plan

Fri, Jan 18th, 2013
Posted in All Agriculture

What is the “Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Plan”? The original NFMP was developed by the Nitrogen Fertilizer Task Force as directed by the 1989 Comprehensive Groundwater Protection Act. The primary goal of the Plan is to prevent degradation ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Fertilizing grass pastures

By Jerrold Tesmer

Fri, Jan 18th, 2013
Posted in All Agriculture

Are you looking for ways to get more out of your pasture? Have you ever soil tested your pasture? Do you treat your pasture like a valuable crop? As with other crops, adequate fertilizer is needed for optimal economic production. This could mea ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Windbreaks: a long-term investment with environmental benefits

Fri, Jan 18th, 2013
Posted in All Agriculture

Rick Grooters, Conservation Specialist In many parts of Fillmore County, the constant force of wind exaggerates weather conditions and makes living in these areas seem unbearable. Cost share is now available to assist landowners in the establishmen ..... 
[Read the Rest]

June 28 Field Day at Willford Farm near Harmony highlights benefits of no-till

Fri, Jan 18th, 2013
Posted in All Agriculture

Bob Joachim, NRCS District Conservationist A No-Till Field Day held at the Arden and Travis Willford farm southeast of Harmony on June 28th was very well attended with over 50 farmers and resource people in attendance. The Fillmore Soil and Water ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Duschee Hills Dairy receives award at MASWCD convention

Fri, Jan 18th, 2013
Posted in All Agriculture

Pat and Chris Troendle, representing Duschee Hills Dairy LLC, of Lanesboro, attended the Minnesota Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts (MASWCD) Annual Convention in Minneapolis on December 4, 2012 to participate in the annual Outsta ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Is updating your conservation plans worth the time and effort? Update your conservation plans and receive a free plat book!

Thu, Jan 17th, 2013
Posted in All Agriculture

Ryan Thesing, Conservation Planning Specialist Some producers/landowners think updating their conservation plan is a difficult process that is not worth the time. I talked to a few of the producers around the county to get their thoughts on the pro ..... 
[Read the Rest]

New hayable buffer program for the south fork of the Root River

Thu, Jan 17th, 2013
Posted in All Agriculture

Donna Rasmussen, Administrator Buffers can be very effective at trapping and controlling sediments, nutrients and pesticides before they enter streams or sinkholes. Streamside buffers comprised of perennial vegetation also reduce stream bank erosio ..... 
[Read the Rest]

Agricultural Best Management Practices (Ag BMP) low interest loans

Thu, Jan 17th, 2013
Posted in All Agriculture

Anne Koliha, Feedlot Engineering Technician Loan dollars are available to help correct existing water quality problems and used to restore or protect water quality. At an interest rate of 3 percent and for a term of 5 to 10 years, many local lender ..... 
[Read the Rest]
<< | < | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | > | >>