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Garnås wheel still spinning after 200 years


Fri, Sep 13th, 2002
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February 4, 2002

Inheriting a 200-year-old Garnås family spinning wheel from my Grandmother, Stella (Bårdsgård) Nelson, was exhilarating. Having myself been an avid handspinner for years, I could visualize what the assembled spinning wheel would look like from the cardboard box full of blue colored parts.

The three-legged Saxon spinning wheel is a double-drive type that can be easily disassembled, transported and reassembled. While reassembling the wheel, I discovered that "OSSB" had been pressed into each individual piece of wood.

I visited the Hallingdal Folkemuseum in Nes, Norway last summer hoping to determine what the "OSSB" represented. A staff researcher found that the initials belonged to Ola Syverson Breie, a carpenter in Ål i Hallingdal that built wheels. According to the Ål Bygde Soge, a district history book, the spinning wheel was constructed in the late 1700's or early 1800's.

In 1833, my Great-Great-Great-Grandparents, Bjørn Olson Sata and Sidsel Nielsdatter Nubgarden most likely moved the spinning wheel from their farm in Ål to the Gårnas farm near Nes i Hallingdal. They lived on the Garnås farm for 20 years until they immigrated to America in 1853, where they used Garnås for their last name.

The spinning wheel came to America in Sidsel Nielsdatters Garnås family trunk. The trunk was painted by famous Norwegian rosemalers, Herbrand Sata and his son, Nils Herbrandson Bæra, who were relatives of Bjørn Sata. Across the front are the words "Sidsel Niels Datter Fod (born) 1803 Malet (painted) 1823." This distinctive Hallingdal trunk is owned by my Aunt Glorianne Knox of Mabel, MN.

Sheep to shawl

Until about 1300, yarn was spun on a handheld spindle. The spinning wheel made its European appearance during the 14th century. The Saxon wheel was introduced about 150 years later and became an important part of everyday living in Norway.

The Saxon spinning wheel was built for productivity by enlarging the drive wheel. A normal day's work can yield about 8,000 yards of single ply yarn. The blue paint on the treadle (foot pedal) of my spinning wheel was extremely worn, indicative of years of spinning by my ancestors.

I was fortunate to receive a picture of my Great-Grandmother, Sidsel (Bearson) Bårdsgård plying yarn. Plying is a process of re-spinning two or more yarns together. The yarn can then be used for knitting, crocheting, or weaving.

To get the wool from the "she .....
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Garness Church roots go back to farm in Norway

Fri, Sep 13th, 2002
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December 31, 2001

The familiar sounds I grew up with, the unloading of the horses, the snorting and pawing, and the cinching of the saddles were all heard that cold blustery day, January 14, 1996. However, someone very important to me was missin ..... 
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"You are a Hjørnevik, but who are you?"

Fri, Sep 13th, 2002
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Delivering tragic immigrant news about the 1862 Sioux Uprising 114 years laterBy Deb Nelson GourleyNovember 12, 2001

When I found the Hjørnevik farm near Evanger i Voss, in the Bergan area of Norway in 1976, I felt like I w ..... 
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Astri Herbransdatter 1812

Fri, Sep 13th, 2002
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Tracing the history of a Norwegian trunk"By Deb Nelson GourleyOctober 22, 2001

The wagon was fully loaded for the burn pile out in the woods, when I spotted the old painted trunk on the flatbed. I was a second grader at the ..... 
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Norwegian Ancestry Series

Fri, Sep 13th, 2002
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The following articles are part of a Norwegian Ancestry series by Deb Nelson Gourley. Deb was raised SE of Preston, MN, at Amherst, and is writing a book about her Norwegian heritage. Deb is a layout editor at the Journal

Fri, Sep 13th, 2002
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Rushford-Peterson Wrestling Team

Fri, Sep 13th, 2002
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Rushford-Peterson Wrestling. Front row from left: Ben Kruze, Travis Johnsgaard, Abe Wilkemeyer. Middle row: Ben Johnson, J.J. Pettit, Christian Dahl, Nick Langseth, Dustin Johnson. Back row: Matt Rislov, Darrin Dessner, Joe Rye, Lee Johnson, Ryan Agr ..... 
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Fri, Sep 13th, 2002
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Fri, Sep 13th, 2002
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