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More on Weeds


Wed, Sep 20th, 2000
Posted in

Monday, September 18, 2000

OK, so I got a little carried away two weeks ago when I wrote about loving your weeds. Maybe tolerating some of your weeds is a little more appropriate. Maybe I have a really weedy garden this year and I know you do too, so here’s a few tips from a reprinted article found on Organic Garden magazine website, entitled: "Weeds"

Mulch: A thick layer of mulch keeps light from reaching weeds. "Without adequate light, the plants don't produce enough chlorophyll to enable further growth. Most of these plants sicken and die before you even notice them," writes Miranda Smith "The few plants that do manage to stick their leaves into the light will be shallowly rooted and very easy to pull."

Organic mulches—straw, grass clippings, leaves, shredded bark—nourish the soil as they decompose. They are fairly effective weed barriers. For even better weed protection, use several sheets of newspaper, kraft paper (the paper used to make grocery bags) or cardboard under these mulches. In a 1992-93 study at the University of Vermont, a 6-inch layer of shredded newspaper applied at the beginning of one season allowed no more than 8 weeds per square yard to sprout for two summers. Without renewing the mulch layer, the newspaper controlled weeds for two seasons. Kraft paper and cardboard allow even less light to reach weeds and are even more impenetrable.

Hoeing: Annual weeds die when you sever the stems from the roots just below the soil surface. With a sharp hoe, you cut the weeds easily. Forget about the square-headed traditional garden hoe for this job - go for an oscillating or collinear hoe.

To hoe your garden without cultivating a backache, hold the hoe as you would a broom—that is, with your thumbs pointing up. Skim the sharp sides of the hoe blade through the top inch of the soil.

Solarization: You can let the sun help you get rid of persistent weeds, if you're willing to leave the bed fallow for six weeks in the summer. Get started in late spring or early summer by pulling, hoeing or raking out as many weeds as you can from the garden bed. Then, moisten the soil and cover it with clear plastic, weighting or burying the edges. Leave the plastic in place for 6 weeks. When you remove the plastic, the sun will have cooked weeds that would otherwise have sprouted.

Handpulling: Here's the trick to comfortable, quick weed pulling:

• "Put your hands in front .....
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Hoffman Stables

This work is not for the birds

Wed, Sep 20th, 2000
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Monday, September 4, 2000

I stand on the roof of our workshop holding the end of a rope. My husband has tied the opposite end around his waist so he doesn't slip as he hammers nails into our new metal roofing. Although I am alert to the danger ..... 
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Wed, Sep 20th, 2000
Posted in

"Please Don’t Touch the Rattlesnakes!"By John LevellMonday, August 21, 2000

Rattlesnake! The single word most likely to elicit a response from those who live or play along the Root River State Trail, especially during these more temperate, ple ..... 
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A walk in the woods

Wed, Sep 20th, 2000
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Monday, September 18, 2000

There’s always a welcome relief to a September. The kids are back in school, the humidity and temperature drop a point or two and even the pesky summer bugs are starting to disappear. It’s a perfect time for a walk i ..... 
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A Favorite Teacher

Wed, Sep 20th, 2000
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Monday, September, 2000

The sunlight is suddenly different. Insects seem to respect our peace and quiet at night a bit more than they did a few weeks ago. There is a scent of dust on sunny days and the air feels cooler and dryer than just days ..... 
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Survivors

Wed, Sep 20th, 2000
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Monday, August 28, 2000

This is a story about survivors.

No, it is not about the gameshow/psychodrama that was recently portrayed on CBS, where neurosis is a developmental skill highly valued by artificially created tribal groups.
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Sam’s bath

Wed, Sep 20th, 2000
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Monday, September 18, 2000

It was a beautiful Saturday morning, a day that you might expect to enjoy in June rather than September. My dog, Sam and I took a walk through the woods while my wife was entertaining some of her friends out on the d ..... 
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Journal Profile # 79

Wed, Sep 20th, 2000
Posted in

Name: Jim Attwood
Home: Preston
Profession: Court Administrator for Fillmore County
Family: Wife Kathy, Daughters Jessica and Emily
Hobby: History, travel, ham radio, computers
Last Book Read: ..... 
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Apple Harvest Squares

Wed, Sep 20th, 2000
Posted in

1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar, divided
1/2 cup butter or margarine
4 cups sliced peeled apples
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 egg, lightly beaten
1/3 cup evaporated milk
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