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"Where Fillmore County News Comes First"
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Friday, December 9th, 2016
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Quality education on individual levels


Fri, May 10th, 2013
Posted in All Commentary

By Eric Leitzen

The last time we met, I discussed the latest punch-up dust-up in the wild world of education, a sort of “Rumble in the Blackboard Jungle” if you will. On one side, there’s the ideas of STEM and the Common Core, who stress a Math and Science based course of education. There’s a lot of influence being put on so-called “outcome based” education in this camp, which is a teacher’s way of saying there’s going to be tests. Naturally, this sort of approach is being challenged from the other side of the school spectrum and the defenders of Humanities courses like History and Psychology, along with Arts classes like Music and, well, Art. School is not simply a place to learn how to pass tests and follow formulas, they say, it is a place to grow as a human being. However, America’s declining test scores and scores of new graduates lacking in what appears to be basic skills would beg to differ on the main goal of education. So, how do we go about making amends between the hard-focus STEM folks and the enrichment-minded folks on the other side?

Now, being the good, moderate, independent thinker that I am, my first thought was a simple one: why can’t we just do both? My wife hates it when I say things like that, and most of the time I just say it to get out of making a tough decision (pizza or Chinese for dinner? Don’t make me choose!), but you can only have so many egg rolls on a pizza before you start to resemble an obese slug. As harsh as that analogy is, it’s sadly what’s happening with our current education system: we want to encourage the best, but at the same time keep ourselves from discouraging the ones who aren’t doing as well, and we’re ending up with egg roll pizza. Something has to change, something’s got to give, and you just might be surprised to know that, in some ways, it’s already happening.

I taught for a few years in a big district. Big as in, the third biggest district in an entire state big. Naturally, this big big district had a big big body of students, and they went to separate schools all over the big big town. It was my experience as a sub that lead me to a peculiar discovery one day: a tech high school. Now, being raised in a town of less than 3,000 (and then moving to one of just over 300) I only ever knew one kind of high school. But down there, there are high schools for the artistically minded, the engineering minded, and even a basic skills high s .....
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Guest Commentary: Can unions survive the implementation of Affordable Care?

Fri, May 10th, 2013
Posted in All Commentary

By Jeff Erding, Wykoff, Minn. Democratic candidates enjoy overwhelming support from labor unions of all types. It is doubtful President Obama could have been elected without the votes and financial contributions of the unions. Unions may be small ..... 
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How Politics Has Changed

By Lee Hamilton

Fri, May 10th, 2013
Posted in All Commentary

By Lee Hamilton When two senators recently got into a spat over whether the Boston Marathon bombings were being politicized, the news was everywhere within minutes. Reams of commentary quickly followed. In the maneuvering over gun-control legislat ..... 
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How Politics Has Changed

By Lee Hamilton

Mon, May 6th, 2013
Posted in All Commentary

When two senators recently got into a spat over whether the Boston Marathon bombings were being politicized, the news was everywhere within minutes. Reams of commentary quickly followed. In the maneuvering over gun-control legislation, every twist a ..... 
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Murdering ourselves

By Col. Stan Gudmundson

Mon, May 6th, 2013
Posted in All Commentary

John Adams once said that “democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide”. In a book first published in 1942 economist Joseph Schumpeter asks the question, ..... 
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Impacting our communities

Fri, May 3rd, 2013
Posted in Spring Valley Commentary

By Tim Penny, Southern Minnesota Initiative Foundation Recently, our Foundation (Southern Minnesota Initiative Foundation) held its annual community luncheon in Spring Valley. Each year, we do this type of community visit to celebrate our accomplis ..... 
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One Moment, Please... Taking a break for some sunshine

Fri, May 3rd, 2013
Posted in All Commentary

By Jason Sethre Publisher Fillmore County Journal & Olmsted County Journal Cell: 507-251-5297 jason@fillmorecountyjournal.com Probably one of the greatest things about raising our two children is that their busy lives force my wife and I to ta ..... 
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Baby Steps Toward Full Equality

Fri, May 3rd, 2013
Posted in All Commentary

By Karen Reisner Spring is a time of new beginnings, new life, and growth. Finally, winter is leaving us, kicking and screaming as it exits. Social and cultural changes move at a snail’s pace and years of seasons come and go before evidence ..... 
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One Moment, Please... Are we ready for change?

Fri, Apr 26th, 2013
Posted in All Commentary

By Jason Sethre Publisher Fillmore County Journal & Olmsted County Journal Cell: 507-251-5297 jason@fillmorecountyjournal.com While attending the Southern Minnesota Initiative Foundation (SMIF) event on April 18th at Four Daughters Winery and ..... 
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