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Tuesday, June 28th, 2016
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Management of wild parsnip


By Michael Cruse

Mon, Jun 27th, 2016
Posted in All Agriculture

By Michael Cruse

Extension Educator for

Fillmore and Houston Counties

You do not have to drive too far down a county road today before you see wild parsnip in a ditch, field or pasture. If you have seen some wild parsnip you have likely seen a lot of it. Large patches of wild parsnip are currently in bloom in the area. Wild parsnip is usually two to five feet tall with yellow flowers arranged in an umbrella shape. When fully grown, the stem of the plant has groves and hairs and becomes almost woody. Wild parsnip is similar in appearance to other plants like cow parsnip, Queen Anne’s lace and water hemlock.

Wild parsnip is a particularly nasty weed. It was first brought to North America by European settlers and was grown as a root vegetable. It eventually escaped domestic cultivation and now thrives in disturbed landscapes across North America. It is considered to be highly invasive and is on the Minnesota State Noxious Weeds List. Like other invasive weed species, if wild parsnip is left unmanaged it can spread rapidly. The resulting large monocultures can replace native plants and desirable pasture plant populations.

The characteristic that sets wild parsnip apart from other weed species is its ability to cause significant skin damage to humans and livestock. This skin damage is caused by a reaction between sunlight and chemicals in the plant. Medically the reaction in humans is referred to as phytophotodermatitis. The plant chemicals that contribute to the reaction, furanocoumarins, are found in all parts of the plant and are particularly concentrated in the seeds and plant sap. People should avoid having bare skin come into contact with wild parsnip, especially when the plants are in full bloom. Livestock that have eaten wild parsnip can develop similar blisters and sunburns. The chemical enters the animals’ blood stream and reacts with sunlight when in the small capillaries at the skin surface.

As you might expect, control of wild parsnip can be rather challenging. Wild parsnip is a biennial that reproduces by seed, so preventing the plant from going to seed is absolutely critical. For a number of reasons, control is best accomplished when the plants are small. Multiple chemicals work well on small wild parsnip plants, but you have to be careful when using chemical control as wild parsnip tends to grow with other desired plants that would also die after a herbicide a .....
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Unemployment Rate Steady at 3.8% in May

Mon, Jun 27th, 2016
Posted in All Business Announcements

Employers cut 1,900 jobs during the month ST. PAUL – The Minnesota unemployment rate was unchanged at a seasonally adjusted 3.8% in May, according to figures released today by the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEE ..... 
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Ask a Trooper - 6.27.16

By Sgt. Troy Christianson

Mon, Jun 27th, 2016
Posted in All Police Reports

By Sgt. Troy Christianson Minnesota State Patrol Question: My husband and I are arguing about the proper way to stop at a stop sign. He insists if you are 20 feet away from the sign and stop, because a car in front of you may have stopped and th ..... 
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Rushford Village addresses communication issues over project

By Kirsten Zoellner

Mon, Jun 27th, 2016
Posted in Rushford Village Government

By Kirsten Zoellner The Tuesday, June 21 Rushford Village council meeting wrapped up in just under and hour and a half, but the majority of the meeting focused on just one of a dozen agenda items. The 2016 Road Project is underway in various porti ..... 
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Government this week - 6.27.16

Mon, Jun 27th, 2016
Posted in All Government

• Monday, June 27, Spring Valley City Council, City Hall, 6 p.m. • Monday, June 27, City of Rushford City Council, City Hall, 6:30 p.m. • Monday, June 27, Chatfield City Council, City Hall, 7 p.m. • Tuesday, June 28, Fillmore County Comm ..... 
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Special mural program at Preston Public Library June 28

Mon, Jun 27th, 2016
Posted in Preston Arts & Culture

Mark June 28, 7 p.m. on your calendar for the upcoming Preston Public Library program, “Preston’s Community Mural: Meet the Artist, See the Process - Start to Finish.” A library program not to be missed! The featured guest speaker is form ..... 
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Correction - 6.27.16

Mon, Jun 27th, 2016
Posted in All Commentary

In the June 20, 2016 Fillmore County Journal article titled “Lanesboro Council considers feasibility study for new assisted living center”, Michael Brown was mentioned as the chair of the EDA. He is actually the secretary of the EDA. We apolo ..... 
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It’s his nature

Mon, Jun 27th, 2016
Posted in Fountain Commentary

By Karen Reisner This November I will cast my vote in a presidential election for the twelfth time. Each time I have chosen the person that I most agreed with and felt was best equipped to do the job. Even when my choice failed to win, I never once ..... 
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Preston 2016 sealcoating project

Mon, Jun 27th, 2016
Posted in Preston Government

By Karen Reisner Public Works director Jim Bakken presented a proposal for the 2016 street sealcoating project at the city council’s June 21 meeting. Bakken had listed streets in the proposal at three levels of priority, noting that a lot of th ..... 
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