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Berries for Winter Birds


Fri, Nov 9th, 2001
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Virginia CooperMonday, November 12, 2001

More than just winter interest, you can add color to your landscape and feed the birds by planning ahead and incorporating berries into your garden plan.

There are lots of plants that have great berries, but more challenging is finding the small trees and shrubs whose berries hang on all through winter.

Crabapple
These dwarf trees range from 15 to 20' tall and have been developed for a bountiful flower show in the spring. The small apples that follow can be a nuisance to rake up in fall. Here are just a few of the many varieties known to hold on to their apples through the winter.
• Flame Blooms in early spring; white flowering followed by red fruit.
• Kelsey Pink/purple flowers are followed by red fruit.
• Pink Spires Pink flowers followed by bright red fruit.
• Prairie Fire Red flowers followed by maroon fruit.

Roses
Rose Hips provide bright color after fall foliage is gone. They are good forage for birds and other animals. The ones to watch for are any type of Rugosa rose. These are very hardy shrub roses that don't need any mulching or special care. For best hips prune them back hard in early spring, to 6-8". Don't cut any flowers or you'll be cutting the hips.

Viburnum
Most viburnums do produce some type of berry but only the Highbush Cranberry or American Cranberry bush will hold fruit all winter. These are magnificent shrubs, with good fall leaf color. They can grow to 8' to 10'.

Lots of other plants are worth mentioning here, Barberry, Chokeberry (Aronia), Coralberry or Winterberry shrubs; Black Cherry, Hawthorne are other tree selections. They all have good berries but may vary as to how long the berries hang on after a hard freeze.

Planting Garlic
Garlic can be planted now, before the ground freezes. Break bulbs into individual cloves. Plant 2-3 inches deep. Cloves will grow into bulbs that can be harvested next year. They will sprout in spring and look a little like onions and a little like leeks.

About mid summer next year flower scapes will form. This means that the plant is diverting energy from the bulb and into seed production. You don't want this to happen. Prune off scapes and eat them like chives. They can be chopped and added to soups, salads, stews or stir-fry.

Finely chopped garlic scapes can also be dried in the oven or a dehydrator and used through the winter as you would use dried onions or chive .....
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Take Your Time

Fri, Nov 9th, 2001
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Monday, Octovber 22, 2001

I’m all goofed up again. Daylight savings time, or lack of it, is the culprit. Just when a guy is getting used to it then we spring ahead or fall back. It makes sense in my mind, but my body just doesn’t buy the reali ..... 
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The other battle in Afghanistan is for food

Fri, Nov 9th, 2001
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Monday, November 12, 2001

While the United States attacks Taliban-held positions in Afghanistan, there is another critical battle underway in the central Asian country: how to feed the millions of people without food.

We haven’t been ..... 
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Fri, Nov 9th, 2001
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Fri, Nov 9th, 2001
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Fri, Nov 9th, 2001
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Fri, Nov 9th, 2001
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To the editor,

We are thankful for the courageous leadership of our government officials in this difficult time, and for the restraint they showed, not responding with a knee-jerk reaction, but working to build a wide coalition of nations.
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Submit a Letter to the Editorhere

Fri, Nov 9th, 2001
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To the Editor,
Monday, November 12, 2001

To the Editor,

I just heard on the radio that many charities are noticing a decrease in revenue, one reason being the downturn of the economy.

Well, the people of Carimona Town ..... 
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Vernon H. Vigeland

Fri, Nov 9th, 2001
Posted in

Vernon H. Vigeland, 77, of LaCrosse, Wis., formerly of Mabel, Minn. died March 12, 2001 at the Green Lea Manor Nursing Home in Mabel where he had resided for only a week.

Vernon was born September 5, 1923 in Preble Township, Fillmore County, M ..... 
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